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In an override of the "Seed" method of a DatabaseInitializer I've added some items to the context but I'm getting referential integrity errors I presume because the items are being added to the database in the wrong order. How is the order defined?

I can add the items to the db with raw SQL after the db has been generated so I don't think there's anything wrong with the data.

E.g.

            new List<PropertyType>
            {
                new PropertyType {Name = "Text"},
                new PropertyType {Name = "Colour"},
                new PropertyType {Name = "Image"}
            }.ForEach(e => context.PropertyTypes.Add(e));

        base.Seed(context);

       new List<Property>
            {
                new Property {Name = "font", PropertyTypeId = 1},
                new Property {Name = "colour", PropertyTypeId = 2},
                new Property {Name = "background-image", PropertyTypeId = 3}
            }.ForEach(e => context.Properties.Add(e));

        base.Seed(context);

I can run the first seed on its own and it works. Second seed causes a referential integrity error. Totally simple relationship.

public class Property
{
    [Key]
    public int PropertyId { get; set; }

    [Required, StringLength(100)]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public int PropertyTypeId { get; set; }
    public PropertyType PropertyType { get; set; }
}

public class PropertyType
{
    [Key]
    public int PropertyTypeId { get; set; }

    [Required, StringLength(50)]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public IList<Property> Properties { get; set; }
}
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What is base.Seed? –  Ladislav Mrnka Feb 23 '12 at 12:46
    
Its a call to the base class version of Seed. I tried taking it out. It makes no difference. I think I read somewhere that calling it allows one to trap errors in the above code but I don't think it does that. –  Ian Warburton Feb 23 '12 at 12:51
    
It depends what initializer is your parent class. Default initializers have this method empty. Also what do you mean by "second seed"? Are those two parts executed together? –  Ladislav Mrnka Feb 23 '12 at 13:13
    
The parent class is DropCreateDatabaseAlways<>. Yes those two parts are executed together. The parent entity first and then the child entity as defined by the relationship between the two. So the parent instances should be there to be referenced by the children! This works fine for other entities with similar relationships between the two. I assumed that the order of the inserts was defined by the model but there seem to be exceptions where EF, unless I've missed something, simply gets it wrong. –  Ian Warburton Feb 23 '12 at 13:37
    
Show your Property and PropertyType classes. –  Ladislav Mrnka Feb 23 '12 at 13:39
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not exactly what I was looking for but this works...

            new List<PropertyType>
            {
                new PropertyType
                    {
                        Name = "Text",
                        Properties = new List<Property> {new Property {Name = "font"}}
                    },
                new PropertyType
                    {
                        Name = "Colour",
                        Properties = new List<Property> {new Property {Name = "color"}}
                    },
                new PropertyType
                    {
                        Name = "Image",
                        Properties = new List<Property> {new Property {Name = "background-image"}}
                    }
            }.ForEach(e => context.PropertyTypes.Add(e));
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Order of inserts is defined by your model. If you have referential constrains in database you must correctly set up your model to reflect those constraints in relations (navigation properties) otherwise EF doesn't know about these constraints.

You can seed data with RAW SQL by using context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand

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Well I'm not convinced it works and I ran context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand after the seeding and got what looked like the same error. Its difficult to know what the error is because the exception is so generic. –  Ian Warburton Feb 23 '12 at 12:31
    
Oh yes I found the Sql exception and its a referential integrity error. –  Ian Warburton Feb 23 '12 at 12:41
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