Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following code:

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult Edit(int req)
{
    var viewModel = new  EditViewModel();
    viewModel.RequestId = int;
    return View(viewModel);
}

[HttpPost]
Public ActionResult Edit(EditViewModel viewModel)
{
// some code here...
}

It works fine: when the edit form is posted, I have the action controller who is called.

Now I modify some little bit my code like this:

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult Edit(int req)
{
    var viewModel = new  EditViewModel(req);
    return View(viewModel);
}

[HttpPost]
Public ActionResult Edit(EditViewModel viewModel)
{
// some code here...
}

public class EditViewModel()
{
    public EditViewModel(int req)
    {
        requestId = req; 
    }
    ...
}

In this new version, I have a view model with a contructor.

This time, when my form is posted back, the action controller is never triggered.

Any idea?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

That's normal. The default model binder can no longer instantiate your view model as it doesn't have a parameterless constructor. You will have to write a custom model binder if you want to use view models that don't have a default constructor.

Normally you don't need such custom constructor. You could simply have your view model like that:

public class EditViewModel()
{
    public int RequestId { get; set; }
}

and the POST action like that:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(EditViewModel viewModel)
{
    // some code here...
}

and now all you have to do is POST the requestId parameter instead of req and the default model binder will do the job.

And if for some reason you wanted to use a view model with custom constructor, here's an example of how the custom model binder might look like:

public class EditViewModelBinder : DefaultModelBinder
{
    protected override object CreateModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext, Type modelType)
    {
        var req = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue("req");
        if (req == null)
        {
            throw new Exception("missing req parameter");
        }
        int reqValue;
        if (!int.TryParse(req.AttemptedValue, out reqValue))
        {
            throw new Exception(string.Format("The req parameter contains an invalid value: {0}", req.AttemptedValue));
        }

        return new EditViewModel(reqValue);
    }
}

which will be registered in your Application_Start:

ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(EditViewModel), new EditViewModelBinder());
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for this precise response. The reason why I would like to move some code to the constructor of my view model is to keep my controller as light as possible. I have a lot of code to 'prepare' my view model and it 'pollute' my controller... My first idea was to move it to the constructor of my view model. Maybe this is not a good idea... What do you think? Thanks anyway. –  Bronzato Feb 23 '12 at 13:04
    
@Bronzato I have same requirements like you as to pass on some object in constructor of vm and it should encapsulate how to process it and set its own properties. Are you using the above solution or leant any other solution to solve this? –  SiddharthP Feb 3 '14 at 21:52
    
I used the solution suggested above. –  Bronzato Feb 6 '14 at 4:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.