Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

the code is:

     int main(int argc, const char* argv[] )
     {
        struct node * initialpointer=NULL;
        insert("asd", initialpointer, 1);
        if(initialpointer!=NULL)
            printf("isnotnull");
        if (initialpointer==NULL)
            printf("isnull");
     }
     insert(char* x,struct node * initialpointer, int numberofelements){
        struct node B;
        B.word = x;
        B.parent = NULL;
        B.leftchild = NULL;
        B.rightchild = NULL;
        printf("%d", 12);
        if ( initialpointer == NULL){
           initialpointer = &B;
           B.parent = NULL;
        }
     }

So in the end I want initialpointer to point where nde B is but in the main method it prints it is null. So how can I change the initialpointer in function insert permanently?

share|improve this question
4  
B is deleted when the function exits. you should allocate memory (malloc) for your initialpointer node. –  vulkanino Feb 23 '12 at 13:04
    
Can you trim out all the irrelevant bits of your code? The numberofelements value seems to be irrelevant to the problem, for example, as does anything to do with the parent/leftchild/rightchild values. –  me_and Feb 23 '12 at 13:11
    
the methods are langer than they seem. I cut off the irrelevant parts already. but I did not want to change the structure of the functions and function calls. –  Eren Bellisoy Feb 23 '12 at 13:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are a couple problems with your code.

First is the problem you're having. The pointer you're passing to insert is passed by copy; the function gets a copy and main doesn't see your change. The solution to this is to pass a pointer to the pointer. See the POSIX function strtol for a standard library example of how this looks.

The second problem is that you're returning a pointer to a local, automatic (i.e. stack-allocated) variable. Since the stack is released on function exit, this pointer points to invalid memory when it is back in main. So instead you need to allocate B from the heap.

So, fixing things up:

 int main(int argc, const char* argv[] )
 {
    struct node * initialpointer=NULL;
    insert("asd", &initialpointer, 1);
    if(initialpointer!=NULL)
        printf("isnotnull");
    if (initialpointer==NULL)
        printf("isnull");
 }
 insert(char* x,struct node ** initialpointer, int numberofelements){
    struct node *B;
    B = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    B->word = x;
    B->parent = NULL;
    B->leftchild = NULL;
    B->rightchild = NULL;
    printf("%d", 12);
    if ( *initialpointer == NULL){
       *initialpointer = B;
       B->parent = NULL;
    }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you it seems like working. Can you give some more information about the idea. Why am I passing the address of initialpointer? –  Eren Bellisoy Feb 23 '12 at 13:25
    
Because, when you call a function, the function only ever gets a copy of what you pass it. Pass an integer? The function gets a copy, and can alter it however it wants and the calling code sees nothing. Pass a pointer? Same thing; function gets a copy. So in this case, you pass a pointer to the pointer (i.e. a struct node **). The copy passed to the function then points to the original struct node *, and the function can alter it. The general guideline is: If the function needs to alter it, you need to pass a pointer to it. –  Mike DeSimone Feb 23 '12 at 15:18

Do not return a pointer to a local variable, this will result in a dangling pointer:

struct node B;
...
initialpointer = &B;

You need to pass a pointer to a pointer to a struct node to insert() and malloc() a new struct node inside insert():

insert(char* x,struct node ** initialpointer, int numberofelements)
{
    if (NULL == *initialpointer)
    {
        *initialpointer = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
        if (*initialpointer)
        {
            /* Note: you should probably make a copy of 'x',
               using 'strdup()' or similar, otherwise there
               is requiremenet that 'x' exist for the lifetime
               of '*initialpointer': which would be error prone. */
            (*initialpointer)->word       = x;
            (*initialpointer)->parent     = NULL;
            (*initialpointer)->leftchild  = NULL;
            (*initialpointer)->rightchild = NULL;
        }
    }
}

This retains the logic of the original insert() as a node should only be created and assigned to initialpointer if initialpointer is NULL.

And invoke it:

struct node * initialpointer=NULL;
insert("asd", &initialpointer, 1);

Remembering to free() it when no longer required:

free(initialpointer);
share|improve this answer
    
number of elements is ignored though. but maybe he doesn't need it. –  vulkanino Feb 23 '12 at 13:19
    
@vulkanino, yes. The OP may just be working his way towards using that and is wanting to ensure he can return a new node. –  hmjd Feb 23 '12 at 13:25
struct node * initialpointer=NULL;
insert("asd", &initialpointer, 1);
...
void insert(char* x,struct node ** initialpointer, int numberofelements){
...
if ( *initialpointer == NULL){
    *initialpointer = &B;

But keep in mind that this as well won't work with your current B as auto (local) variable.

You must malloc() B.

And you are missing an else branch in your if statement.

share|improve this answer

This is problematic for two reasons.

First of all, you are changing a local-scope variable, since initialpointer is a parameter of your function. That means, regardless of its type, what you write to the variable itself is only visible inside your insert function. If you were writing to *initialpointer that would be whole different story.

Now, what is even more problematic is that B is a local variable that is sitting on the stack inside your function. Once that function is left, the storage location of B will be invalid. Hence, if you return the pointer to B, accessing that object outside of insert will invoke undefined behaviour and will very likely not work (you have a slim chance that that particular location has not been altered, but that is pure luck).

What you probably want instead of

initialpointer = &B;

is this:

*initialpointer = B;

This will copy the B object to the storage location that is referenced by the pointer variable. Now it is okay for B to go out of scope, because you copied everything to the initialpointer variable that is sitting inside main.

Note that the initialpointer variable inside main is a completely different thing than the one in insert!


One last thing, giving variables names that start with uppercase letters is not valid in any naming scheme I came across so far.

share|improve this answer
    
That wont work. You say that put B into where initial pointer points. However it usually points critical parts in memory and When i do that i get segmantation fault –  Eren Bellisoy Feb 23 '12 at 13:26
    
Yes, that is correct. At some point you have to allocate some memory for it. This can be done either on stack of main (by declaring an actual struct node variable -- not a pointer) or dynamically by calling malloc. Once you have a valid place to put your data, you can write to it inside your insert function. –  bitmask Feb 23 '12 at 14:46

Edited per @Paul Mitchell's comment.

 int main(int argc, const char* argv[] )
 {
    struct node* initialpointer = insert("asd");
    if ( initialpointer == NULL )
       /* handle the error */

    /* remember to free() all the allocated nodes */
 }


 struct node* insert(char* x)
 {
    struct node* initialpointer = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    if ( initialpointer == NULL)
        return NULL;  

    initialpointer.word = x;
    initialpointer.parent = NULL;
    initialpointer.leftchild = NULL;
    initialpointer.rightchild = NULL;
    return initialpointer;
 }

This will allocate a single node (I've removed the numberofelements parameter).

To allocate space for more than a node, you have to pass a pointer to a pointer. But if I understand your intent, you want a node to be part of a linked structure, maybe a tree, so you don't need to create a container for the nodes, since you can traverse the structure to access the nodes.

share|improve this answer
    
you are right, I'll change my answer for that. –  vulkanino Feb 23 '12 at 13:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.