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I am having problems copying data from my device back to the host. My data are arranged in a struct:

typedef struct Array2D {
    double* arr;        
    int rows;       
    int cols;       
} Array2D;

arr is a 'flat' array. rows and cols describes the dimensions.

The code below shows how I am trying to copy the data back to the host:

h_output = (Array2D*) malloc(sizeof(Array2D));
cudaMemcpy(h_output, d_output, sizeof(Array2D), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
double* h_arr = (double*) malloc(h_output->cols*h_output->rows*sizeof(double));
cudaMemcpy(h_arr, h_output->arr, h_output->cols*h_output->rows*sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
h_output->arr = h_arr;

However, in the fourth line the execution fails with cuda error 11 (invalid argument). I cannot see why this is happening. The size of the array is correct, and I can access both h_output and h_array from the host and both have 'real' addresses.

EDIT Sorry for the late response to the request for more information (= more code).

I have tested that the pointer d_output->arr is a device pointer, by trying to access the value of the device pointer on the host. As expected, I was not allowed to do that leaving me with the thought that d_output->arr is in fact a valid device pointer.

The code's objective is to solve Thiele's differential equation using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method.

class CalculationSpecification
{

    /* FUNCTIONS OMITTED */

public:
    __device__ void RK4_n(CalculationSpecification* cs, CalcData data, Array2D* d_output)
    {
        double* rk4data = (double*)malloc((data.pdata->endYear - data.pdata->startYear + 1)*data.pdata->states*sizeof(double));

        /* CALCULATION STUFF HAPPENS HERE */

        // We know that rows = 51, cols = 1 and that rk4data contains 51 values as it should.
        // This was confirmed by using printf directly in this function.
        d_output->arr = rk4data;
        d_output->rows = data.pdata->endYear - data.pdata->startYear + 1;
        d_output->cols = data.pdata->states;
    }
};


class PureEndowment : CalculationSpecification
{
    /* FUNCTIONS OMITTED */

public:
    __device__ void Compute(Array2D *result, CalcData data)
    {
        RK4_n(this, data, result);
    }
};


__global__ void kernel2(Array2D *d_output)
{
    /* Other code that initializes 'cd'. */
    PureEndowment pe;
    pe.Compute(d_output,cd);
}


void prepareOutputSet(Array2D* h_output, Array2D* d_output, int count)
{
    h_output = (Array2D*) malloc(sizeof(Array2D));
    cudaMemcpy(h_output, d_output, sizeof(Array2D), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost); // After this call I can read the correct values of row, col as well as the address of the pointer.
    double* h_arr = (double*) malloc(h_output->cols*h_output->rows*sizeof(double));
    cudaMemcpy(h_arr, h_output->arr, h_output->cols*h_output->rows*sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost)
    h_output->arr = h_arr;
}

int main()
{
    Array2D *h_output, *d_output;
    cudaMalloc((void**)&d_output, sizeof(Array2D));

    kernel2<<<1,1>>>(d_output);
    cudaDeviceSynchronize();

    prepareOutputSet(h_output, d_output, 1);

    getchar();
    return 0;
}

EDIT2

Additionally, I have now tested that the value of d_output->arr when running on the device is identical to the value of h_output->arr after the first cudaMemcpy-call in prepareOutputSet.

share|improve this question
1  
The most likely source of the error is houtput->arr not being a valid device pointer. Can you expand your code a little to show how you are allocating and copying the contents of d_output to the device? –  talonmies Feb 23 '12 at 13:36
    
d_output and its contents are allocated on the device using malloc(). I am sure that it contains actual data, as I tried printing the content of d_output->arr and got the expected output. –  ssnielsen Feb 23 '12 at 13:55
    
Do you mean h_output and its contents ? Because d_output does not appear in your example code. –  pQB Feb 23 '12 at 15:06
1  
You can't copy from host to host using cudaMemcpy! You say d_output was allocated using malloc ? did you mean cuadMalloc ? –  Pavan Yalamanchili Feb 23 '12 at 15:08
    
@ssnielsen Can you clarify if you are doing what talonmies is suggesting ? –  Pavan Yalamanchili Feb 23 '12 at 15:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This (copying device-allocated memory using cudaMemcpy) is a known limitation in CUDA 4.1. A fix is in the works and will be released in a future version of the CUDA runtime.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice to hear that. –  ssnielsen Mar 8 '12 at 8:56
    
@harrism: I got the same error code. On further investigation, I found that there was not enough RAM left to copy the data back to the CPU. Thus, cudaMemcpy was failing. Is this a valid reason for the error code or am I going the wrong way? –  Programmer Dec 23 '12 at 17:04
    
That's a different problem than described here. –  harrism Jan 3 '13 at 0:53

The error you are seeing is almost certainly caused by h_output->arr not being a valid device pointer, or by h_output->rows or h_output->cols having incorrect values somehow. You have chosen not to show any code explaining how the contents of the source memory d_output have been set, so it is not possible to say for sure what is the root cause of your problem.

To illustrate the point, here is a complete, runnable demo showing the posted code in action:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>

inline void GPUassert(cudaError_t code, char * file, int line, bool Abort=true)
{
    if (code != 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "GPUassert: %s %s %d\n", cudaGetErrorString(code),file,line);
        if (Abort) exit(code);
    }       
}

#define GPUerrchk(ans) { GPUassert((ans), __FILE__, __LINE__); }

typedef float Real;

typedef struct Array2D {
    Real* arr;        
    int rows;       
    int cols;       
} Array2D;

__global__ void kernel(const int m, const int n, Real *lval, Array2D *output)
{
    lval[threadIdx.x] = 1.0f + threadIdx.x;
    if (threadIdx.x == 0) {
        output->arr = lval;
        output->rows = m;
        output->cols = n;
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    const int m=8, n=8, mn=m*n;

    Array2D *d_output;
    Real *d_arr;
    GPUerrchk( cudaMalloc((void **)&d_arr,sizeof(Real)*size_t(mn)) ); 

    GPUerrchk( cudaMalloc((void **)&d_output, sizeof(Array2D)) );
    kernel<<<1,mn>>>(m,n,d_arr,d_output);
    GPUerrchk( cudaPeekAtLastError() );

    // This section of code is the same as the original question
    Array2D *h_output = (Array2D*)malloc(sizeof(Array2D));
    GPUerrchk( cudaMemcpy(h_output, d_output, sizeof(Array2D), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost) );
    size_t sz = size_t(h_output->rows*h_output->cols)*sizeof(Real);
    Real *h_arr = (Real*)malloc(sz);
    GPUerrchk( cudaMemcpy(h_arr, h_output->arr, sz, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost) );

    for(int i=0; i<h_output->rows; i++)
        for(int j=0; j<h_output->cols; j++)
            fprintf(stdout,"(%d %d) %f\n", i, j, h_arr[j + i*h_output->rows]);

    return 0;
}

I have had to take a few liberties here, because I only have a compute capability 1.2 device at my disposal, so no device side malloc and no double precision. But the host side API calls which retrieve a valid Array2D structure from device memory and use its contents are effectively the same. Running the program works as expected:

$ nvcc -Xptxas="-v" -arch=sm_12 Array2D.cu 
ptxas info    : Compiling entry function '_Z6kerneliiPfP7Array2D' for 'sm_12'
ptxas info    : Used 2 registers, 16+16 bytes smem

$ cuda-memcheck ./a.out 
========= CUDA-MEMCHECK
(0 0) 1.000000
(0 1) 2.000000
(0 2) 3.000000
(0 3) 4.000000
(0 4) 5.000000
(0 5) 6.000000
(0 6) 7.000000
(0 7) 8.000000
(1 0) 9.000000
(1 1) 10.000000
(1 2) 11.000000
(1 3) 12.000000
(1 4) 13.000000
(1 5) 14.000000
(1 6) 15.000000
(1 7) 16.000000
(2 0) 17.000000
(2 1) 18.000000
(2 2) 19.000000
(2 3) 20.000000
(2 4) 21.000000
(2 5) 22.000000
(2 6) 23.000000
(2 7) 24.000000
(3 0) 25.000000
(3 1) 26.000000
(3 2) 27.000000
(3 3) 28.000000
(3 4) 29.000000
(3 5) 30.000000
(3 6) 31.000000
(3 7) 32.000000
(4 0) 33.000000
(4 1) 34.000000
(4 2) 35.000000
(4 3) 36.000000
(4 4) 37.000000
(4 5) 38.000000
(4 6) 39.000000
(4 7) 40.000000
(5 0) 41.000000
(5 1) 42.000000
(5 2) 43.000000
(5 3) 44.000000
(5 4) 45.000000
(5 5) 46.000000
(5 6) 47.000000
(5 7) 48.000000
(6 0) 49.000000
(6 1) 50.000000
(6 2) 51.000000
(6 3) 52.000000
(6 4) 53.000000
(6 5) 54.000000
(6 6) 55.000000
(6 7) 56.000000
(7 0) 57.000000
(7 1) 58.000000
(7 2) 59.000000
(7 3) 60.000000
(7 4) 61.000000
(7 5) 62.000000
(7 6) 63.000000
(7 7) 64.000000
========= ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors
share|improve this answer
    
The original question is now updated with more code. Hopefully it sheds some light over the problem. –  ssnielsen Feb 24 '12 at 13:06
    
That extra code you have posted doesn't change the conclusion of this answer - it clearly shows that if the pointer in question is a valid device pointer, the original API code you posted works corrected. The real question is why is your device malloced pointer is invalid by the time it is returned the to host. –  talonmies Feb 25 '12 at 11:06

I tried allocating the pointer Array2D->arr on the host using cudaMalloc instead of allocating it on the device using malloc. After that, the code works as intended.

It looks very much like the problem described in the thread (http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=222659) on nVidia's forum that Pavan referred to in the comments to the question.

I think that probably closes the question for now, as the code works fine. However, if anyone has a proposal for a solution which utilizes malloc on the device, feel free to post.

share|improve this answer

It looks like h_output is allocated with a call to malloc(). In the first call to cudaMemcpy() (line 2), h_output is being used as as a host pointer (which seems right). In the second call to cudaMemcpy() (line 4), h_output->arr is being used as a device pointer (which does not seem right). In that 4th line, it looks like you are copying from host memory to host memory. So, you will probably want to use just a straight memcpy() instead of cudaMemcpy().

At least that is what it looks like from the code you have provided.

share|improve this answer
    
That isn't really what the code is doing at all. It should be perfectly fine, but only if h_output->arr (and by extension d_output->arr which is the source memory) hold valid device pointers. –  talonmies Feb 23 '12 at 15:15
    
I'm not sure I follow. h_output is allocated with malloc(). Then cudaMemcpy() is used to copy into it using it as a host pointer. Then (without setting h_output->arr other than what it was set to from the previous call to cudaMemcpy()) cudaMemcpy() is called again using h_output->arr as a device pointer. And it seems that you make a comment to that effect around the question. –  Jonathan DeCarlo Feb 23 '12 at 16:27
    
After the cudaMemcpy() call, h_output effectively points to a copy of the device memory structure that d_output pointed to. If d_output->arr was a valid device pointer, so is h_output->arr after the copy. –  talonmies Feb 23 '12 at 17:18
    
Tricky! I didn't know that was possible. Fair enough then. Thanks! –  Jonathan DeCarlo Feb 23 '12 at 18:47
    
I wouldn't say it was "tricky". More like "pointer indirection 101" : don't just think about what memory space a given pointer is in, think about what is contained in the memory it points to. –  talonmies Feb 24 '12 at 8:18

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