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I have two div elements inside one div element. These two div elements are both 50% wide and other one is floated to left and the other is floated to right. The right floated div contains one high picture (in different heights) and left floated div contains text. On the left div these texts are separated into three different sized rows and the whole left div should be as high as the right div. How am I able to do this using only CSS? Here's my example code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<style type="text/css">
body {
    margin: 0;
}
.container {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    overflow: auto;
    background: #FF0;
}
.left {
    float: left;
    width: 50%;
    background: #F0F;
}
.left .first {
    height: 20%;
}
.left .second {
    height: 50%;
}
.left .third {
    height: 30%;
}
.right {
    float: right;
    width: 50%;
}
.right img {
    display: block;
    max-width: 100%;
}
p {
    margin: 0;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>          
    <div class="container">
        <div class="left">
            <div class="first">
                <p>First</p>
            </div>
            <div class="second">
                <p>Second</p>
            </div>
            <div class="third">
                <p>Third</p>
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="right">
            <img src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3a/Centara_Grand_Hotel.jpg" alt="" />
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
i'm really interested in your question, here's a jsFiddle (jsfiddle.net/9DyDW/5) with your code, i'm playing with it but i can't figure out what's going on. the problem is actually the height:100% rule in the .left class, if you change that to pixels it sorts itself out. but why the 100% doesn't work beats me – Spyros Mandekis Feb 23 '12 at 14:08
    
The problem is that you can't specify a height in % if the containing block also has a height in %, see the W3 spec on this (specifically the "<percentage>" bit). You can see this in action if you set .container { height: 400px; } in your original code: that makes the purple boxes get correct heights. – Jeroen Feb 23 '12 at 15:02
    
I was afraid I can't accomplish this with only percentages. I guess I have to use JS to catch height of the image and give same height for the .left container. Thanks for your help! – nqw1 Feb 24 '12 at 7:20

The short answer is that you can kind of do this, but I don't think it will behave the way you expect.

You would have to declare explicit heights for the two <div>'s -

.left, .right {
   height: 100px /*or whatever height you want*/;     
}

If this is a static page, and the image never changes, you can manually enter the pixel amount.

If the picture is going to change, and you don't know what the height is going to be, you cannot get the left div to match the height of the right div using plain CSS.

There are ways to fake it (see the faux columns technique), but you cannot programmatically get one div to change it's height to match another one.

There are ways to do this with JavaScript, but I'm not going to get into them because you asked about CSS (and I hate using JS to manipulate layout like that - it's very unreliable).

Also: if your containing div, .container, collapses, it's because you need to either float it, or apply a clearfix technique.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help! Image on right will change and have different heights so I guess I'll have to use JS to catch height of .right element and give same height to .left element. – nqw1 Feb 24 '12 at 7:21
    
I'm not sure what design you're going after, but it might be worth thinking about modifying the design so differing heights don't matter. For instance, you can have a parent element that has a single background color, our use the faux columns technique to insert a border. If, however, your design can't be accomplished in those ways, yeah, JS is the way to go. – chipcullen Feb 24 '12 at 14:35

There are a few things you need to do:

You need to float the containers.

You need to add an extra container and nest the divs in the following order:

<div class="container2">
  <div class="container">
    <div class="left">
      <div class="first">
        <p>First</p>
      </div>
      <div class="second">
        <p>Second</p>
      </div>
      <div class="third">
        <p>Third</p>
      </div>
    </div>
    <div class="right">
      <img src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3a/Centara_Grand_Hotel.jpg" alt="" />
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Then you need to relative position your containers and move them to the right. After that, you'll move your content divs from the left.

For your CSS:

.container {
  width: 100%;
  float: left;
  position: relative;
  right: 50%;
}
.container2 {
  width: 100%;
  float: left;
  overflow:hidden;
  position:relative;
}
.left {
  float: left;
  width: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  position: relative;
  background: #F0F;
}
.right {
  float: left;
  width: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  position: relative;
}

Please see this page if you're having difficulties.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help! I have tried that but it doesn't help me. It only makes .left and .right divs same height but those paragraph elements inside .left div still doesn't fill up the whole .left div with the given heights. – nqw1 Feb 24 '12 at 7:25

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