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We have a request to implement our webservice response so that xsd:decimal fraction digits will be zero-padded when it's not long enough when a pattern indicates so. I am wondering if this is a reasonable request and if xsd:decimal is supposed to be used with patterns like these. Here is the relevant part of the xsd according to their specs:

<xsd:simpleType>
   <xsd:restriction base="xsd:decimal">
       <xsd:totalDigits value="14"/>
       <xsd:fractionDigits value="2"/>
       <xsd:pattern value="[\-+]?[0-9]{1,12}[.][0-9]{2}"/>
   </xsd:restriction>
</xsd:simpleType>

So the fractionDigits are set to 2 which means the precision can be a maximum of 2 digits. According to http://zvon.org/xxl/XMLSchemaTutorial/Output/ser_types_st2.html it is also fine if there are less fraction digits (for example for a number like 5.1)

But according to the pattern {2} there should always be 2 fraction digits.

We're developing a generic application development platform and there's no telling what the decimal will be used for in advance (currency, pH values, distances, etc). This case comes from a specific project where our platform is being used but normally we won't know what kind of data is being transferred. We could decide to just follow the WSDL in this regard which states it should have 2 fraction digits. but our implementation of it must be very generic.

There is nothing stating with what exactly these fraction digits should be padded with or even that we should pad instead of just leaving out this decimal altogether. In theory we could decide to pad with 5's until it matches the pattern. As far as I know patterns are rarely used and if they are it's used for things like passwords. The XSD specification is vague though so it would be appreciated if someone could shed some light on whether this is valid use of an XSD and if it makes sense for us to decide to pad with 0's.

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+1, nice question –  InfantPro'Aravind' Feb 23 '12 at 15:06
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To be practical, my litmus test would be to look at this from the perspective of the technology stack directly involved or, better yet, that is mainstream.

I can think of JAXB on Java or xsd/svcutil/etc.exe on .NET; A quick test of these pretty common tools against this schema fragment using a value of 1 would fail to produce valid XML. This would send developers scrambling for all sorts of customizations to make it work as per the XSD pattern. Painfull, high developing and maintenance costs...

The same would be applicable to an XSLT; there will be a need to manually format the output... Bottom line, XSD patterns are not machine usable for "automatic" formatting... I have yet to see such a thing...

I also believe that a requirement such as this is unreasonable and I personally feel that it should be considered as an antipattern when it comes to describing data being exchanged. Since there's no absolute, it is conceivable that there must be an exception; I can't think of any, but one must explore the reason why you were presented with such a requirement; I would then try to find a solution that wouldn't involve this pattern...

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Comparing against other technology stacks is a good option, I'll have a look at how they do this, thanks for the suggestion. –  Sebastiaan van den Broek Feb 23 '12 at 16:41
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It actually depends on the parameter of that particular decimal value ..

XML is among the most preferred ones to transport and store data it can have various data. I choose two examples here:

  1. Data is currency, Here my advice is to force [0-9]*[.][0-9]{2} .. aiding to this our Client data restoration software is designed such a way to pad 0s.

  2. Data is a pH value of a chemical, well. Here one digit after decimal point is mandatory. [0-1][0-9][.][0-9]

So it all depends on the object we are referring to .. Unless its really necessary it wouldn't be fair to force the pattern :)

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Thanks for your answer. The thing is that we're developing a generic application development platform and there's no telling what the decimal will be used for in advance. This case comes from a specific project where our platform is being used but normally we won't know what kind of data is being transferred. We could decide to just follow the WSDL in this regard which states it should have 2 fraction digits. but our implementation of it must be very generic. Zero-padding seems reasonable but still rather arbitrary. –  Sebastiaan van den Broek Feb 23 '12 at 15:48
    
I also put this part in my question now to make the issue more clear. Anyway, +1 for the answer but I'll wait for some more opinions :) –  Sebastiaan van den Broek Feb 23 '12 at 15:54
    
@BasvandenBroek, then in that case my opinion is not to force the padding .. you see, if the data is length it can be 1 mtr or 1.2 mtrs or can be 1.25 mtrs .. if we force padding then expecting 1 to be 1.00 sounds odd .. as XSD REJECTS bad patterns :) –  InfantPro'Aravind' Feb 24 '12 at 2:30
    
@BasvandenBroek, well. the better advice would be .. create and use multiple patterns, why not? I assume you will be knowing about the data before it comes to your end .. so validate as per its significance. Please do wait for others' comments too :) –  InfantPro'Aravind' Feb 24 '12 at 2:33
    
No we won't know about the data, all kinds of applications could be made with our framework. But we can parse the WSDL (this is being done at runtime by the development environment of our platform) and find out if there are patterns, so we could just follow the WSDL's wishes and assume zero-padding is what is needed (as opposed to for example leaving the data out entirely) –  Sebastiaan van den Broek Feb 24 '12 at 8:04
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