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public class SomeClass<T>
{
    public T DoSomething()
    {
        var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(this.GetType());
        // Do Things
        return (T)obj;
    }
}

public class DoStuff : SomeClass<DoStuff>
{
}

var ds = new DoStuff();
ds.DoSomething();

this works, but in this scenario:

public abstract class AbstractStuff : SomeClass<AbstractStuff>
{
}

public class DoStuff : AbstractStuff
{
}

var ds = new DoStuff();
ds.DoSomething();

gives me an error, can't instantiate an abstract class, and i understand, i want to do something like this:

public class SomeClass<T>
{
    public T DoSomething()
    {
        var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(this.GetType());
        // Do Things
        return (my not know how to get this casting type)obj;
    }
}

i tryed return (typeof(this))obj;

and don't works, some idea? thanx

SORRY: i forgot to declare AbstractStuff as abstract (corrected)

share|improve this question
    
Isn't it the CreateInstance that's failing? – kaj Feb 23 '12 at 14:36
    
No, CreateInstance is working, the return type must be (not)ç abstract, DoStuff isn't abstract but the T tyoe is AbstractStuffm i need to cast to the type of this, thanx – manuellt Feb 23 '12 at 14:38
    
Is AbstractStuff abstract? – Adrian Iftode Feb 23 '12 at 14:43
    
I've just run the code as posted successfully. Are you sure it's what you're trying? – kaj Feb 23 '12 at 14:48
    
both of your scenarios work for me - are you sure you expose exactly the code you use when doing your tests? – rudolf_franek Feb 23 '12 at 14:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Consider this example from your question...

public class SomeClass<T>
{
    public T DoSomething()
    {
        var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(this.GetType());
        // Do Things
        return (T)obj;
    }
}

...and the case where you have

public abstract class AbstractStuff : SomeClass<AbstractStuff> { }
public class DoStuff : AbstractStuff { }

If you replace the type parameter with the argument, you get this for DoSomething():

public AbstractStuff DoSomething()
{
    var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(this.GetType());
    // Do Things
    return (AbstractStuff)obj;
}

Now let's refactor a bit for ease of "debugging" and add line numbers:

1 public AbstractStuff DoSomething()
2 {
3     var type = this.GetType();
4     var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
5     // Do Things
6     return (AbstractStuff)obj;
7 }

If you call this method on an instance of DoStuff, and break on line 4, you'll see that type is DoStuff; if you break on line 6, you'll see that the run-time type of obj is also DoStuff. Of course, casting that object to AbstractStuff will succeed (and the cast is not even required), because there is always an implicit reference conversion from any reference type to its base type.

Now let's consider the error message you're reporting: "can't instantiate an abstract class". What is that telling us? It says that for some reason, when you call Activator.CreateInstance, you're passing a reference to the type AbstractStuff.

That makes it seem like the sample code you've given us is not accurate. GetType() can never return an abstract type, because an object's run-time type can never be an abstract type. In other words, it's impossible to have an instance of an abstract type.

In fact, the behavior you describe would be expected if you had the line...

var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));

...rather than...

var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(this.GetType());

Are you sure that's not the case?

share|improve this answer
    
you're right, there's something i missed, next days i will post a complete code of the problem, thank. – manuellt Feb 29 '12 at 9:37

This works for me

public abstract class AbstractClass<T> where T : new()
{
    public T DoSomething()
    {
        var obj = new T();

        // Do Things

        return obj;
    }
}

public class DoStuff : AbstractClass<DoStuff>
{
}

var ds = new DoStuff();
ds.DoSomething();

and so does changing the original code like this:

public T DoSomething()
{
    var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));

    // Do Things

    return (T)obj;
}

so that we're creating an instance of the non-abstract derived class not the abstract base class.

share|improve this answer
    
And me..I think we might be missing the point of the question though.. – Myles McDonnell Feb 23 '12 at 14:49

You cannot cast a variable to a type that is not known at compile-time. Think about how you'd call the method:

public class Foo : SomeAbstractClass<Bar>
...

Foo foo = new Foo();
??? newFoo = foo.DoSomething();

Because Foo extends SomeAbstractClass<Bar> your first example would expect to return a Bar, but you seem to be hoping to return a Foo instead. That would only be possible if Bar extends Foo.

Are you trying to do something more like this?

void Main()
{
    DoStuff doStuff = new DoStuff();
    DoStuff doStuff2 = doStuff.DoSomething();
}

public abstract class SomeClass<T> 
    where T : SomeClass<T>, new()
{
    public T DoSomething()
    {
        return new T();
    }
}

public class DoStuff : SomeClass<DoStuff>
{

}
share|improve this answer

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