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Using jquery is it better to create a DOM element like this:-

function create(options)
{
     $('<form action="' + options.action + '"></form>');    
}

Or like this:

function create(options)
{
     $form = $('<form></form>');
     $form.attr('action',options.action); 
}

This may be a matter of opinion. I feel that the second way gives more clarity but I suspect it is less efficient...

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closed as primarily opinion-based by NULL, Hugo Dozois, EdChum, hexacyanide, Divi Jul 6 at 4:15

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
This is called micro-optimization, also know as "the root of all evil". –  Juhana Feb 23 '12 at 14:42
    
@Juhana: You're thinking of premature optimization. I don't know why asking about methods of DOM element construction would be considered premature, or even mirco, optimization. From the question... "I feel that the second way gives more clarity..." –  squint Feb 23 '12 at 14:46
    
"...but I suspect it is less efficient." I think it's safe to say that he's not asking because he's pinpointed this issue to be the performance bottleneck in his code. –  Juhana Feb 23 '12 at 14:58
5  
@Juhana: He's asking if one is conceptually better than the others, and is including clarity as a factor. No, the code probably isn't a bottleneck, which means that performance is not his greatest concern, which means this question isn't all about optimization. That said, not all optimization is "evil". If you can gain even a tiny optimization, and not obscure the meaning of the code, why wouldn't you do it? The "evil" of premature optimization comes from introducing unnecessary bugs, or obscuring the meaning of the code for the sake of marginal gain. Clearly that's not an issue here. –  squint Feb 23 '12 at 15:40
    
The first code is vulnerable to HTML injection. –  Oriol Jul 6 at 2:13
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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

jQuery can create object as following code

$form = $('<form>', {action: 'my action'});

update: attr class must be quoted (bug in IE)

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+1 Beat me to it. Although you should always include the closing tag as some (now outdated) browsers won't add this automatically: Eg. $('<form></form>', {action: 'my action'}); –  Rory McCrossan Feb 23 '12 at 14:44
    
not only outdated. Had a problem with IE8 about not closed form-tag, you can do it like this $('<form/>') –  NULL Feb 23 '12 at 14:48
1  
I'd class IE8 as outdated personally :D –  Rory McCrossan Feb 23 '12 at 14:48
    
1  
update: attr class must be quoted (bug in IE) === reserved word in IE –  NULL Oct 15 '12 at 0:29
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Check this to find out for your self.

Creating DOM notes using jQuery Note higher is better (OPS/Sec = operations per second = how many times per second the given code executes)

And the test winner in every other browser than Opera:

var form = document.createElement("form"),
    $form = $(form);
form.action = options.action;

NOTE:

the native method will be even faster if you don't need a jQuery object:

var form = document.createElement("form");
form.action = options.action;
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+1 If there's any concern about performance and clarity, this would take care of both. –  squint Feb 23 '12 at 14:48
    
+1 I didn't know about jsperf.com - that's very neat, thanks for the introduction! –  rgvcorley Feb 23 '12 at 15:03
    
+1 for jsPerf and suggesting no jQuery. People tend to do everything with jQuery, they should know when it is better or not. –  Lennon Feb 17 at 19:06
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Never hurts to optimize...until it does...you could use straight up JS:

function create(options)
{
  var newform = document.createElement('form');

  newform.setAttribute('action',options.action);
}

Aside from that it's negligible as mentionned above, whatever is easier to read for you...i.e. option 2

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Unless you are running this function many times, any performance difference will be negligible. So I would always go with the clearest, easiest to update solution (i.e. the second one.)

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I always do the second one.

function create(options)
{
     $form = $('<form></form>');
     $form.attr('action',options.action); 
}

I prefer this method simply because it find it more readable.

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Not sure about the actual underlining code of jquery and cannot tell which one has better performance.

Anyway as I can imagine, in the first case jquery will parse attributes anyway and sets values to them, so there should not be big performance difference.

So I think the first solution is more convenient if it contains a lot of html code, otherwise I will prefer second one.

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