Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 3rd party C++ DLL that I call from C#.

The methods are static.

I want to abstract it out to do some unit testing so I created an interface with the static methods in it but now my program errors with:

The modifier 'static' is not valid for this item

MyMethod cannot be accessed with an instance reference; qualify it with a type name instead

How can I achieve this abstraction?

My code looks like this

private IInterfaceWithStaticMethods MyInterface;

public MyClass(IInterfaceWithStaticMethods myInterface)
{
  this.MyInterface = myInterface;
}

public void MyMethod()
{
  MyInterface.StaticMethod();
}
share|improve this question
1  
Maybe you can do it with extension methods: stackoverflow.com/questions/1243921/… –  hcb Feb 23 '12 at 14:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can't define static members on an interface in C#. An interface is a contract, not an implementation.

I would recommend creating the interface as you are currently, but without the static keyword. Then create a class StaticIInterface that implements the interface and calls the static C++ methods. To do unit testing, create another class FakeIInterface, that also implements the interface, but does what you need to handle your unit tests.

Once you have these 2 classes defined, you can create the one you need for your environment, and pass it to MyClass's constructor.

share|improve this answer

Interfaces can't have static members and static methods can not be used as implementation of interface methods.

What you can do is:

public interface IMyInterface
{
    void MyMethod();
}

public class MyClass : IMyInterface
{
    static void MyMethod()
    {
    }

    void IMyInterface.MyMethod()
    {
        MyClass.MyMethod();
    }
}

Alternatively, you could simply use non-static methods, even if they do not access any instance specific members.

share|improve this answer

Static members are perfectly legal in the CLR, just not C#.

You could implement some glue in IL to link up the implementation details.

Not sure if the C# compiler would allow calling them though?

See: 8.9.4 Interface type definition ECMA-335.

Interface types are necessarily incomplete since they say nothing about the representation of the values of the interface type. For this reason, an interface type definition shall not provide field definitions for values of the interface type (i.e., instance fields), although it can declare static fields (see §8.4.3).

Similarly, an interface type definition shall not provide implementations for any methods on the values of its type. However, an interface type definition can—and usually does—define method contracts (method name and method signature) that shall be implemented by supporting types. An interface type definition can define and implement static methods (see §8.4.3) since static methods are associated with the interface type itself rather than with any value of the type.

share|improve this answer
2  
For reference, CLS Rule 19: CLS-compliant interfaces shall not define static methods, nor shall they define fields. It goes on to say that it is okay for CLS compliant consumers to reject these kinds of interfaces. I tried around a year ago to call a static method on an interface and the C# compiler would not compile it. –  Christopher Currens Nov 8 '13 at 0:58

Not sure I am getting you but a static extension method off an interface would be:

public interface IFace{
}

public static class IFaceMethods{
    public static void TestMethod(this IFace instanceOfiFace){
        Console.WriteLine("static extension rocks");
    }
}

Some more code..

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        IFace x = new tt();
        x.TestMethod();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public interface IFace {
}

public static class IFaceMethods {
    public static void TestMethod(this IFace instanceOfiFace) {
        Console.WriteLine("static extension rocks");
    }
}

public class tt : IFace{

}
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, this adds an extension method to objects of type IFace, not the IFace type itself. –  MrNerdHair Jun 17 at 6:51
    
Not sure I understand you, though i am far from an expert: this would make this method appear to be available on anything implementing IFace. which you could be handling as an IFace.. updated answer. –  gordatron Jun 18 at 12:22
    
OP is looking for a method callable as IFace.method(), instead of x.method() where x is of type IFace. It sometimes makes more sense semantically to implement a method on a type than on the members themselves: for example, if you're using a factory method, you won't have an instance of the type to begin with, and it would be silly to new one up just to use the factory method to get another. –  MrNerdHair Jun 20 at 1:15
    
ahhh sorry you mean its effectively not a static method (and certainly not one on the interface).. Yes sorry! I cannot remember now whether it was different wording in the question at the time or if i was just misunderstanding it.. I posted this partly to try and get more info I think. –  gordatron Jun 20 at 6:40

As to why you cannot have a static method on an interface: Why Doesn't C# Allow Static Methods to Implement an Interface?

However, I would suggest removing the static methods in favor of instance methods. If that is not possible, then you could wrap the static method calls inside of an instance method, and then you can create an interface for that and run your unit tests from that.

ie

public static class MyStaticClass
{
    public static void MyStaticMethod()
    {...}
}

public interface IStaticWrapper
{
    void MyMethod();
}

public class MyClass : IStaticWrapper
{
    public void MyMethod()
    {
        MyStaticClass.MyStaticMethod();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You could invoke it with reflection:

MyInterface.GetType().InvokeMember("StaticMethod", BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, null, null);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.