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Im wondering which way of using OOP in Javascript ist best way to go with.

There is this prototype thing and you have the function style way. But both have very bad ways to inherit a base class.

So I tried to build a way to make this possible without having to use prototype and such.

function Car(name) {
    this.Name = name;

    this.FullName = function () {
        return this.Name;
    }
}

function SpecialCar(name, variant) {
    //BaseClass.apply(this, PARAMS AS ARRAY);
    Car.apply( this, [name] );

    //new property
    this.Variant = variant;

    //override function
    this.FullName = function () {
        return this.Name + " " + this.Variant ;
    }
}

var audi = new Car("audi");
$("#result").append(audi.FullName() + "<br>");

var audia3 = new SpecialCar("audi", "a3");
$("#result").append(audia3.FullName()+ "<br>");

You can check the jsFiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/vu9ZF/2/

Is this okay or is it just bad-practice?

Would be very nice to get some answers why other ways are better because I just dont get it.

EDIT: Thank you all for answering me so fast! I was trying to find some way of OOP in javascript for myself, not answering on how to do oop in javascript. I dont like the way of using prototype for that because im using c# most of my worktime and its a bit confusing to switch between "c#-like oop" and "prototype oop". But someone in the comments told me that avoiding prototype isnt a good idea, soo ill drop that.

Thanks stackoverflow your all awesome & saved me so much time =)

share|improve this question
    
I'd checkout Mootools if I were you. It has a Class system built into into thats very easy to understand. –  Dampsquid Feb 23 '12 at 14:50
3  
Why does everyone hate prototypes? –  ChaosPandion Feb 23 '12 at 14:51
    
:/ I cant use other frameworks than kendoui and jquery in my project –  SSchnitzler Feb 23 '12 at 14:51
2  
@SSchnitzler - Think about it for a second... does that reason make much sense logically? –  ChaosPandion Feb 23 '12 at 14:53
1  
@SSchnitzler that's because it is a different language. It is not C(++|#) or Java and will require learning new ways of doing things to use correctly. –  dtanders Feb 23 '12 at 14:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is how it's done:

function Car ( name ) {
    this.name = name;
}

Car.prototype.fullName = function () {
    return this.name;
}

function SpecialCar ( name, variant ) {
    Car.apply( this, arguments );
    this.variant = variant;
}

SpecialCar.prototype = Object.create( Car.prototype );

SpecialCar.prototype.fullName = function () {
    return this.name + ' ' + this.variant;
}; 

(You need to shim Object.create for IE8)

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/3Rehr/


So, the methods should be assigned to the constructor's prototype object, not to the instances themselves.

Also, in order to pre-process the instance with the super-constructor, simply do this:

Car.apply( this, arguments );

so the this.base thing is not needed.

share|improve this answer
    
I know how to do classes and how to inherit them. Its just that i want to know why its done this way and if my way is bad practice. But anyway thanks for your answer. My way shown above works too. –  SSchnitzler Feb 23 '12 at 14:55
    
I believe he wants to know why other ways are better? –  Ramesh Feb 23 '12 at 14:56
    
@Ramesh: yeah thank you –  SSchnitzler Feb 23 '12 at 14:57
1  
@SSchnitzler Ah, I see, you explicitly tried to avoid the prototype objects. Well, that is definitely not a good idea. The methods should be inherited from the prototype. That way, there exists only one instance of each method which is inherited by all instances. –  Šime Vidas Feb 23 '12 at 15:01
1  
@SSchnitzler Just look at my answer. The Car.prototype.fullName has to be outside of the constructor's body. Also, you need to manually set up the inheritance (B.prototype = Object.create( A.prototype );. It's all in my answer. –  Šime Vidas Feb 23 '12 at 15:32

It's not particularly recommandable because you actually return a Car instance and not a SpecialCar instance.

audia3 instanceof Car === true;
audia3 instanceof SpecialCar === false;

This is confusing because you do execute new SpecialCar. Also properties of SpecialCar.prototype wouldn't be available on the instance, but you seem to be using a custom inheritance copying pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
Ooh, good point. +1. I've abandoned all pretense of a reliable instanceof, but still, it's a good point. –  Ryan Kinal Feb 23 '12 at 15:04
    
instanceof is reliable, it's just the way he did inheritance is wrong. –  Knownasilya Jan 21 '13 at 16:37

The way I usually go is the one described in this page

It gives the code a more structured link, even thou I like the feature in your code of being able to call the parent's constructor.

function Car( name ) {
  this.Name = name;
}

Car.prototype.FullName = function FullName() {
  return this.Name;
}


function SpecialCar( name, variant ) {
  this.Name = name;
  this.Variant = variant;
}

SpecialCar.prototype = new Car();
SpecialCar.constructor = SpecialCar;

SpecialCar.prototype.FullName = function FullName() {
  return this.Name + " " + this.Variant; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's the difference between SpecialCar.prototype = Object.create( Car.prototype ); and how you did it: SpecialCar.prototype = new Car(); SpecialCar.constructor = SpecialCar;, is there no shim required for IE8? –  Knownasilya Jan 21 '13 at 16:39
1  
@Knownasilya Using Object.create is the proper way to set up inheritance. new Car() also works but it it flawed as it pollutes the object with unnecessary instance properties (.Name in this case). And yes, you'll need to polyfill Object.create for IE8 (use es5-shim). –  Šime Vidas Jan 21 '13 at 17:26

As far as the constructor pattern goes, I actually prefer your method, rather than using apply or anything similar. It might get a little confusing due to the necessity of return, but it doesn't feel quite as dirty as apply to me.

However, I prefer using prototypal inheritance a little more directly, with Object.create:

var Car = {
    fullName: function() {
        return this.name;
    }
}

var SpecialCar = Object.create(Car);
SpecialCar.fullName = function() {
    return this.name + ' ' + this.variant;
};

var audi = Object.create(Car);
audi.name = 'audi';

var audiA3 = Object.create(SpecialCar);
audiA3.name = 'audi';
audiA3.variant = 'A3';

Some browsers don't support Object.create natively, but it is shimmable.

share|improve this answer
    
Your code won't work - the second argument of Object.create has to be a hash of property descriptors. A simple hash of properties is not valid. So: Object.create( Car, { fullName: { value: function () { ... }, enumerable: true }); –  Šime Vidas Feb 23 '12 at 15:16
    
Hah, you're right. Completely forgot about that. –  Ryan Kinal Feb 23 '12 at 15:21
2  
Although I wish that your method was valid. Property descriptors suck :P –  Šime Vidas Feb 23 '12 at 15:22
    
I suppose there's pd, which makes things easier. –  Ryan Kinal Feb 23 '12 at 15:27

This is how I would do it. Needs some sugar code for it to work. You can find OoJs on github. OoJs covers most of the OOP features from C++, except for multiple inheritance and enforcing pure virtual functions...

;( function class_Car( namespace )
{
    'use strict';

    if( namespace[ "Car" ] ) return    // protect against double inclusions

        namespace.Car = Car
    var Static        = TidBits.OoJs.setupClass( namespace, "Car" )


    // constructor
    //
    function Car( name )
    {
        this.Name = name               // data member, private by default

        return this.Public( FullName ) // method FullName will be public
    }


    function FullName()
    {
        return this.Name;
    }

})( window )




;( function class_SpecialCar( namespace )
{
    'use strict';

    if( namespace[ "SpecialCar" ] ) return    // protect against double inclusions

        namespace.SpecialCar = SpecialCar
    var Static               = TidBits.OoJs.setupClass( namespace, "SpecialCar", "Car" )


    // constructor
    //
    function SpecialCar( name, variant )
    {
        this.Super( name )

        this.Variant = variant

        return this.Public( FullName )
    }


    function FullName()
    {
        return this.Car.FullName() + " " + this.Variant
    }

})( window )


var audi = new Car("audi");
$("#result").append(audi.FullName() + "<br>"); // output: audi

var audia3 = new SpecialCar("audi", "a3");
$("#result").append(audia3.FullName()+ "<br>"); // output: audi a3
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