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I have problem running and debugging this piece of code:

bool readSectionHeaders(char* path, int numOfSections, int peSectionsOff, IMAGE_SECTION_HEADER* out) {
    bool retr = false; //return value

    //open file
    FILE* file;
    file = fopen (path, "rb");
    if(file == NULL) {
        perror("WRG"); //TODO
        return false;
    }

    do { //do while(false) only for easier error correction

        //seek to first section
        fseek(file, peSectionsOff, SEEK_SET);

        //read all sections
        unsigned int count;
        IMAGE_SECTION_HEADER sectionHeaders[numOfSections];
        count = fread(sectionHeaders, sizeof(IMAGE_SECTION_HEADER), numOfSections, file);

        //check Bytes count
        if(count != sizeof(IMAGE_SECTION_HEADER)*numOfSections) {
            break;
        }

        //copy sections
        memcpy(out, sectionHeaders, count);

        //exit successfully
        retr = true;
    } while(false);

    //exit
    fclose(file);

    return retr;
}

What is strange is that it returns false even when it reads the file. I tried to debug it and here is the strangest part.

I go line by line until this one

if(file == NULL) {

Then even though file is not NULL it skips perror and moves to

return false;

But does not return at all.

I again go line by line until

retr = true;

where it seems to do something, however retr remains false.

Then it closes file and returns with false.

I have never come across something like this. I tried cleaning project, rebuilding, even deleting files and redownloading them from subversion. Before using this function, I use similar one - I read PE headers. So I though a problem could be with reading the file but it doesn§t explain debug behavior.

After returning from function, I use perror and it writes No error.

I use mingw with QtCreator.

Thanks in advance.

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? What is it then? –  Samuel Feb 23 '12 at 14:50
    
OK, it is C++ I just noticed the bool, however it is very C like (which is bad) I think your error is coming for your if(...) break; clause. –  111111 Feb 23 '12 at 14:59
    
it is very C like (which is bad) - Thanks, but is it Really bad or is it just bad habit? –  Samuel Feb 23 '12 at 15:16
1  
I think some of the things in your code are really bad (using a while(false) so you can use a break). Using FILE* instead of stream isn't bad bad but stream obey the C++ conventions such as RAII and are strongly encouraged. Basically what it boils down to is that you are writing C with class which is sort of bad style, you are ignoring lots of C++ idioms and abstractions which were added to make the language safer, easier and often faster. For example you have used a char* instead of std::string, a array instead of a vector, FILEs instead of iostream and returning bools rather than expections. –  111111 Feb 23 '12 at 15:32
    
While false is actually a great idea - I've got it from IBM. You can do whatever code you do and check for errors and if something fails, you skip the rest of it and clean memory, close files etc... Normally, I use C++ and streams for files, I just did not want to bother with type conversions (since stream.read reads only chars). But thank you anyway. It did point me to right direction :). –  Samuel Feb 24 '12 at 11:28

2 Answers 2

I would do something more like this, if it is able to load the whole array then it will return true.

std::ofstream file(path, std::ios::binary);

if(!file) {
    std::cerr << "failed to load file" << std::endl;
    return false;
}   

file.seekg (peSectionsOff, ios::beg);

IMAGE_SECTION_HEADER sectionHeaders[numOfSections];
size_t size=sizeof(sectionHeaders)*numOfSections;

return  //return true if the whole buffer is filled
    file.readsome(static_cast<char*>(sectionHeaders), size) == size;

UNTESTED

this might be helpful http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/io

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, this was both my and mingw's problem. I've re-installed whole QtSDK with no effect. Then I installed different version of mingw and set qt creator up to use it. Now debugger works without problem. I'm not sure what happened but cerr << "TEST"; also stopped working with the old mingw and this is 100% correct.

As 111111 suggested, problem was with if break clause. I thought read returns number of bytes read and this was simply not true :).

Now it is working, thanks to 111111 for his suggestion :).

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