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I have a PHP multidimensional associative array with the following structure:

Fields: TYPE - COLOUR - SIZE - PRICE
[0] - rose, var2, var3, price
[1] - rose, var2, var3, price
[2] - daffodil, var2, var3, price
[3] - tulip, var2, var3, price
[4] - rose, var2, var3, price
[5] - tulip, var2, var3, price
[6] - daffodil, var2, var3, price

I want to go through this array and for each type I want to choose the one with the lowest price and delete all other rows of that type. The keys don't have to be preserved.

In the end I want an array with only one row for each type.

Getting confused at how to do this so any pointers gratefully received.

EDIT: Sorry probably have made my array clear enough, here's another snippet of it:

Fields: TYPE - COLOUR - SIZE - PRICE

[0] - type=>rose, colour=>var2, size=>var3, price=>£price
[1] - type=>rose, colour=>var2, size=>var3, price=>£price
[2] - type=>daffodil, colour=>var2, size=>var3, price=>£price
[3] - type=>tulip, colour=>var2, size=>var3, price=>£price
[4] - type=>rose, colour=>var2, size=>var3, price=>£price
[5] - type=>tulip, colour=>var2, size=>var3, price=>£price
[6] - type=>daffodil, colour=>var2, size=>var3, price=>£price
share|improve this question
2  
How is this associative? – Mikhail Feb 23 '12 at 14:57
    
Hi, Have edited my example above now to display it more clearly. – T W Feb 23 '12 at 15:18
    
a var_export() of your array would help provide identical example. On a side note I betcha you have all this data in a database. If that's the case you may offload the work onto the DB instead of PHP – Mikhail Feb 23 '12 at 15:19
    
Hi, no my data isn't from a DB it's dynamic data. Just going to look at your answer now! – T W Feb 23 '12 at 15:21
    
Well that's a shame :) If you database it eventually, check out this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/3998529 – Mikhail Feb 23 '12 at 15:24
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edited version of Mikhail's solution to return what OP asked for.

$minid = array();
$minPrice = array();

foreach ($flower as $id => $f) {
  if (!isset($minPrice[$f['type']]) || $f['price'] < $minPrice[$f['type']]) {
    $minPrice[$f['type']] = $f['price'];
    $minid[$f['type']] = $id;
  }
}

$filtered = array();
foreach ($minid as $id)
  $filtered[] = $flower[$id];
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to work for me creating an array with numeric keys with only one of each type left in the array at the end. Thanks. – T W Feb 23 '12 at 16:22

Your task doesn't actually require sorting. You're simply searching for the lowest item (adj. per type!)-- this can (still!) be done in O(n).

$cheapest = array();

foreach ($flower as $id => $f) {
  $c_price = $cheapest[$f['type']]['price'];
  if (!$c_price || $f['price'] < $c_price) {
    $cheapest[$f['type']] = $f;
  }
}

print_r($cheapest);

Edit: modified my answer. This creates an associative array, with the key being the type, and the value being the original array with lowest price.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
1  
The OP isn't simply searching for the lowest item, but instead for the lowest item per TYPE. – Josh Feb 23 '12 at 15:07
    
@Josh, thanks! fixed the answer – Mikhail Feb 23 '12 at 15:16
    
I like the "= $f" solution. That's much more elegant than I had. – phpmeh Feb 23 '12 at 15:21
    
@phpmeh, when I learned that "trick" it seemed redundant, but I've since started using this in MANY cases for preparing data for future use. – Mikhail Feb 23 '12 at 15:22
1  
@Mikhail my favorite thing abt SO is meeting PHD CS candidates who teach me new tricks :P – phpmeh Feb 23 '12 at 15:24
<?php

// First, let's define the data we'll be working through.
$flowers = array(
    array('type'=>'rose',     'colour'=>'var2', 'size'=>'var3', 'price'=>'£9.99' ),
    array('type'=>'rose',     'colour'=>'var2', 'size'=>'var3', 'price'=>'£8.67'),
    array('type'=>'daffodil', 'colour'=>'var2', 'size'=>'var3', 'price'=>'£16.04'),
    array('type'=>'tulip',    'colour'=>'var2', 'size'=>'var3', 'price'=>'£4.39' ),
    array('type'=>'rose',     'colour'=>'var2', 'size'=>'var3', 'price'=>'£12.49'),
    array('type'=>'tulip',    'colour'=>'var2', 'size'=>'var3', 'price'=>'£4.49' ),
    array('type'=>'daffodil', 'colour'=>'var2', 'size'=>'var3', 'price'=>'£11.99'),
);

// Define the array which will store our final flower prices
$flower_prices = array();

// Loop through our flowers to find the lowest price.
foreach($flowers as $flower) {
    // Remove the pound from the price, and cast as a floating point decimal.
    $price = (float) str_replace('£', '', $flower['price']);
    if(!array_key_exists($flower['type'], $flower_prices)) {
        // First flower type encounter. By default, as of right now, this is the "cheapest".
        $flower_prices[$flower['type']] = $flower;
    } else if($price < (float) str_replace('£', '', $flower_prices[$flower['type']]['price'])) {
        // Flower type previously encountered, and the now encountered flower is cheaper.
        $flower_prices[$flower['type']] = $flower;
    }
}

// Now that we've determined which flowers are cheapest, we can print the results:
foreach($flower_prices as $price) {
    print $price['type'] . ': ' . $price['price'] . "\n";
}
share|improve this answer

Taking Mikhail's one step further to hopefully be more in line with what you're asking:

    $selectedRows = array();
    foreach ($flower as $id => $f) {
       if( ! isset( $selectedRows[$f['type']] ) ) {
          $selectedRows[$f['type']]['id'] = $f['id'];
          $selectedRows[$f['type']]['price'] = $f['price'];
       } else {
           if ( $f['price'] < $selectedRows[$f['type']]['price'] ) {
             $selectedRows[$f['type']]['price'] = $f['price'];
             $selectedRows[$f['type']]['id'] = $f['id'];
           } 
       }
    }
    // Now you can look through the selectedRows, use the 
    foreach( $selectedRows as $v ){
        echo $flower[$v['id']].' $'.$v['price'].'<br />';
    }

Also, if you're making your array like this:

$flower[0]["rose"]["blue"]["large"]["4.99"] = whatever;

I would advise towards changing it to:

$flower[0] => array( "type" => "rose", "color" => "blue", "size" => "large", "price" => "4.99" );

share|improve this answer

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