Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a small piece of code. Posted by Russian company Yandex as a part of their interview. What are potential problems here? It looks very simple, should be hidden problems I can not see.

First header

//Foo.h
#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>
@interface Foo : NSObject
{
   NSString* str;
   static int i = 0;
}

- (NSString*) str;
@end

Another file

//Foo.m
#import "Foo.h"
@implementation
- (id) init
{
   return [self initWithStr:"number:" someInt:6];
}

- (id) initWithStr:(NSString*)theStr someInt:(int)value
{
   self = [super init];
   str = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%d", theStr, value];
   return self;
}

- (NSString*) str
{
   return str;
}

- (void) setStr:(NSString*)theStr
{
   str = theStr;
}
@end

And the last file

//main.m
#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>
#import "Foo.h"
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
   Foo objA;
   NSLog([objA str]);
   [objA setStr:@"hello world!"];
   NSLog([objA str]);

   Foo* objB = [[Foo alloc] init];
   Foo* objC = [[Foo alloc] initWithStr:@"My magic number:" value:265];
   objB = objC;

   NSLog([objB str]);

   [objA release];
   [objB release];
   [objC release];

   return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
the string object is not copied. In addition @implementation is missing Foo. –  flexaddicted Feb 23 '12 at 15:04
    
These files are a treasure trove of errors and other potential issues. Declaring and initializing statics in the @interface, not checking the result of super init, releasing objB twice, not releasing objC. There's probably more. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 23 '12 at 15:09
2  
The biggest potential problem is that they will interview someone, or even hire someone, who used stackoverflow to solve this problem. –  rob mayoff Feb 23 '12 at 19:45
    
I call it rational way of solving problems. Let someone else to think for you. –  Ask Feb 23 '12 at 20:37
1  
question from Yandex ;) –  Ask Mar 23 '12 at 10:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In another file:

@implementation

implementation of what? must specify.

In the last file:

Foo objA;
   NSLog([objA str]);
   [objA setStr:@"hello world!"];
   NSLog([objA str]);

This will crash, local variable Foo objA is not initialized, it would be fine it was set to nil, since messages to nil are ok in objective c but it is not.

Here:

 [objA setStr:@"hello world!"];

That method will give a compile warning since that method is not declared in the interface, but it will still call the method.

Here:

- (id) init
{
   return [self initWithStr:"number:" someInt:6];
}

Missing @ for the string @"number:"

Here:

objB = objC;

You just leaked objB, since there is now no valid reference to release the previous allocation.

[objA release];

This was never allocated!

[objB release];

[objC release];

The second one will crash since they both refer to the same object, and the retain count is only 1.

The first file also has some potential issues such as declaring a method that appears to be a getter without declaring a property for the ivar, same with the setter, would be better to just declare a property.

share|improve this answer
    
You cannot declare Foo objA (on the stack) should be at least Foo *objA –  Boklucius Apr 28 '12 at 9:26
@interface Foo : NSObject
{
   NSString* str;
   static int i = 0;
}

You cann't define static int i = 0; here. Type name does not allow storage class to be specified Foo.h

share|improve this answer
    
it's just the addition to @OscarGomez answer –  beryllium Feb 23 '12 at 15:15

Also, the setter needs to release the previous string and retain the new one.

- (void) setStr:(NSString*)theStr
{
  if(str) {
    [str release];
  }
  str = [theStr retain];
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.