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I need to do row-wise operations more than 15 million times, but have too slow code. Here is a small reproducible example:

costMatrix1 <- rbind(c(4.2,3.6,2.1,2.3),c(9.6,5.5,7.2,4.9),c(2.6,8.2,6.4,8.3),c(4.8,3.3,6.8,5.7))
costMatrix2 <- costMatrix1 #Example, the costMatrix2 is actually different from costMatrix1

tbl_Filter <- rbind(c(0,0,0,4),c(1,2,3,4),c(1,0,3,0),c(1,2,0,0),c(1,2,0,4))

tbl_Sums <- data.frame(matrix(0, nrow=10, ncol=2))
colnames(tbl_Sums) <- c("Sum1","Sum2")

for (i in 1:nrow(tbl_Filter))
{
  tbl_Sums[i,1] <- sum(costMatrix1[tbl_Filter[i,],tbl_Filter[i,]])
  tbl_Sums[i,2] <- sum(costMatrix2[tbl_Filter[i,],tbl_Filter[i,]])
}

I think to replace the for-loop with ddply is the solution, but I can't get it to work. Your help is very appreciated!

/Chris

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you have very large arrays to work with, you are probably better off sticking to base R.

Here is how you could use sapply to solve the summing problem for a single matrix. Then use it repeatedly on each input matrix:

sumOne <- function(cost, filter){
  sapply(1:nrow(filter), function(i)sum(cost[filter[i,], filter[i,]]))
}


cbind(
    sumOne(costMatrix1, tbl_Filter),
    sumOne(costMatrix2, tbl_Filter)
)

The results:

     [,1]  [,2]
[1,]  5.7  11.4
[2,] 85.5 171.0
[3,] 15.3  30.6
[4,] 22.9  45.8
[5,] 43.9  87.8

This should be much, much faster than your loop. Not because of the fact that a for loop is intrinsically slower than sapply (it's not), but because sapply automatically reserves memory for the result, combined with the fact that [<- is slow.

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This: t(apply(tbl_Filter,1,function(x){c(sum(costMatrix1[x,x]),sum(costMatrix2[x,x]))‌​})) will be very slightly faster, I think. A tad more if the OP is willing to omit the transpose. –  joran Feb 23 '12 at 15:36

If you have more than one CPU core, using snowfall might help you speed this up. The setup (pre-parallelization):

newfun = function(n) {
  a <- sum(costMatrix1[tbl_Filter[n,],tbl_Filter[n,]])
  b <- sum(costMatrix2[tbl_Filter[n,],tbl_Filter[n,]])
  c(a,b)
  }

nvec = matrix(data = 1:nrow(tbl_Filter), ncol = 1)

t = proc.time()
out = t(apply(nvec,1,function(x) newfun(x)))
proc.time() - t

Now, parallelized:

## load 'snowfall' package
require(snowfall)

## Initialize parallel operation --> choose number of CPUs here!
sfInit( parallel=TRUE, cpus=2 )

##################################################################
## 'Export' functions and variables to all "slaves" so that parallel calculations
## can occur

sfExport(list=list('newfun'))

sfExport('costMatrix1')
sfExport('costMatrix2')
sfExport('tbl_Filter')
sfExport('nvec')

## call function using sfApply; will return values as a list object
 out = sfApply(nvec, 1, function(x) newfun(x))

## stop parallel computing job
sfStop()

tbl_Sums = as.data.frame(t(out))
colnames(tbl_Sums) <- c("Sum1","Sum2")
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Not sure how the speed would compare, but you could also set up matrices to do matrix multiplication. This uses the fact that the information in your tbl_Filter has positive numbers in the columns you want to sum.

> ttt <- apply((tbl_Filter>0)*1,1,function(x) x %*% t(x))
> t(rbind(as.numeric(costMatrix1), as.numeric(costMatrix2)) %*% ttt)
     [,1]  [,2]
[1,]  5.7  11.4
[2,] 85.5 171.0
[3,] 15.3  30.6
[4,] 22.9  45.8
[5,] 43.9  87.8
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+1 This should be nice and fast. –  Andrie Feb 24 '12 at 14:56
    
@Andrie, Thanks, I thought so too but I suspect it will depend on what's big, the filter or the matrix; it's not clear how much faster the apply here might (or might not) be than the sapply in your solution. –  Aaron Feb 24 '12 at 19:32

In addition to the snowfall library mentioned above, there's also multicore that only implements the parallel version of lapply (called mclapply) and not of apply, but it's easy to rewrite the code to accommodate this:

newfun = function(n) {
  a <- sum(costMatrix1[tbl_Filter[n,],tbl_Filter[n,]])
  b <- sum(costMatrix2[tbl_Filter[n,],tbl_Filter[n,]])
  c(a,b)
}

nvec = matrix(data = 1:nrow(tbl_Filter), ncol = 1)

# single-core version using apply
out = t(apply(nvec,1,newfun))

# multicore version using mclapply
library(multicore)
out.list = mclapply(1:nrow(nvec),function(i)newfun(nvec[i,]))) 
out = do.call("rbind", out.list) 

# if the number of rows is huge, this will be much faster than do.call:
library(data.table)
out = rbindlist(out.list)
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