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Consider this code:

using namespace std;

int* get()
{
    unique_ptr<int> p (new int[4]);
    return p.get();
}
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int *arr1=get();
    int* arr2=get();
    for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
    {
        arr1[i]=i;
        arr2[i]=i*2;
    }
    for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
        cout << arr1[i];
    return 0;
}

arr1 and arr2 point to the same area of memory. So they share the same values. I don't understand why, when I call arr2=get() :

unique_ptr<int> p (new int[4]);

This object shouldn't be created again? It isn't deleted because still reachable by arr1. How to get two arrays of different memory areas?

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2  
As soon as get returns, p goes out of scope and deletes the pointer. You will need to return unique_ptr<int>. –  BoBTFish Feb 23 '12 at 15:23
    
@BoBTFish: Good diagnosis, bad cure. –  Ben Voigt Feb 23 '12 at 15:37
    
Is there a reason you can't use std::array or std::vector? Both would be simpler than mucking around with memory allocation yourself. –  luke Feb 23 '12 at 15:43
    
Using get on unique_ptr should almost always be looked on with suspicion, if not being outright wrong. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 23 '12 at 16:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am fairly sure you are playing with undefined behavior which is bad.

the data being pointed to was destroyed when the unique pointer was destroyed, the fact the values are the same, and the same slot was chosen is luck.

for pointers to array type use a vector

std::vector<int> get()
{
    return std::vector<int>(4);
}

int main()
{ 
    std::vector<int> arr1=get();
    std::vector<int> arr2=get();
    return 0;
}

for normal single value pointers then you can return a unique_ptr;

std::unique_ptr<int> get(){
    return std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(0));
}
:::
std::unique_ptr<int> ptr=get();
share|improve this answer
1  
std::move isn't necessary here, there's a rule that says moves are automatically used in places where elision would be allowed, so that includes return values. –  Ben Voigt Feb 23 '12 at 15:30
    
@BenVoigt cool thanks I thought that was the case, I sort of like putting them in because it self documents, showing my intension and reasoning for returning heavy objects. –  111111 Feb 23 '12 at 15:34
2  
Also, std::unique_ptr is much smarter than std::auto_ptr ever was, and now is defined for array types... provided you use it with an array type, e.g. unique_ptr<int[]>. –  Ben Voigt Feb 23 '12 at 15:35
    
Putting std::move actually hurts optimization though, since it forces a move when the compiler could otherwise use NRVO. –  Ben Voigt Feb 23 '12 at 15:36
    
@BenVoigt thanks in that case ill remove it. Yes I know you can use unique_ptr for arrays but vectors are much more apt for it. –  111111 Feb 23 '12 at 15:39

There are a memory leak in such kind of usage of smart pointers. unique_ptr will use operator delete in order to free the allocated memory, but you need delete []. Also the return value of get function will be an invalid ptr because the unique_ptr will free the allocated area. If you need dynamically allocated arrays then use std::vector.

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2  
It's not a memory leak, it's use of memory that's already been freed. –  Ben Voigt Feb 23 '12 at 15:30
    
There are 2 problems the first one is a memory leak, unique_ptr will use the operator delete instead of delete[] in case of array allocation. –  AlexTheo Feb 23 '12 at 15:32
2  
Alex: You're right, that's bad, but it still isn't a memory leak. It's undefined behavior, but a typical implementation will call the wrong number of destructors (which for int is rather meaningless, since the destructor is trivial). –  Ben Voigt Feb 23 '12 at 15:34
    
@BenVoigt: actually there is more than that, it's just Undefined Behavior. An implementation of new[] will probably store the number of elements to be destroyed somewhere (to run said destructors) while in case of new it would be foolish, so the very memory layout could well be different. –  Matthieu M. Feb 23 '12 at 15:41

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