Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to change the background image of a button using Javascript. Here is what I am currently trying, but it is failing.

HTML code -

      <tr id="Rank1">
              <td><button class="darkSquare"></button></td>
               <td><button class="lightSquare" ></button></td>
                <td><button class="darkSquare" ></button></td>
               <td><button class="lightSquare" ></button></td>
                <td><button id="e1" class="darkSquare" ></button></td>
                <td><button class="lightSquare" ></button></td>
                <td><button class="darkSquare" ></button></td>
                <td><button class="lightSquare"> </button></td>
            </tr>

JavaScript Code

        initializer();

        function initializer()
         {
           var tableRow = document.getElementById("Rank1");

           var buttons = tableRow.getElementsByTagName("button");

           for(b in buttons)
            {
               console.log(b.toString());
               b.style.backgroundImage = "url('darkSquare.jpg')";
            }
         }

In the console, I get an error saying b.style is undefined.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

for (... in ...) loops do not work that way in JavaScript it should be:

for (var b = 0; b < buttons.length; b++) {
    buttons[b].style.backgroundImage = "url('darkSquare.jpg')";
}

for (... in ...) actually iterates over all the "members" of an object

eg. using var x = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3} in for(var m in x) console.log(m) will produce

> a
> b
> c

it kind of works with arrays because it considers the indices members like this:

var x = [1,2,3];
for (var m in x) console.log(m);
> 0
> 1
> 2

since it is giving you the indices as if they were members you can't distinguish. the pitfall is:

var x = [1,2,3];
x.stuff = 'boo!';
for (var m in x) console.log(m);
> 0
> 1
> 2
> stuff

General Rule of Thumb: only use for (... in ...) when iterating over members in an object, use for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) when using arrays

you can always cheat and use:

for (var i = 0, item = x[i]; i < x.length; item=x[++i]) {
    // now item is the current item
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. This worked, but why didn't the for in loop work? What was I doing wrong there? –  CodeBlue Feb 23 '12 at 15:36
    
Oh. So in arrays the indices are considered as members. Hmmm. Very helpful. –  CodeBlue Feb 23 '12 at 15:42
    
for (var b in buttons) buttons[b].style... but this doesn't say what you think it does read my edited comment above^ but what it breaks down to is for (... in ...) isn't an iterator like it is in other languages (java, c#, etc...) –  ckozl Feb 23 '12 at 15:42
    
The last line baffles me. Why do you get 0 1 2 and then "stuff"??? –  CodeBlue Feb 23 '12 at 15:46
1  
because I added .stuff as an expando member to the object that is of the type Array in the line x.stuff = 'boo!';, remember ALL JavaScript objects support expando properties. –  ckozl Feb 23 '12 at 15:50

when using for ( ... in .... ) the first parameter is the key in the array so you have to use it like this:

for( b in buttons ) {
    buttons[b].style.backgroundImage = "url('darkSquare.jpg')";
}

working example in jsFiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. –  CodeBlue Feb 23 '12 at 15:39

You should change your loop as so

for(var i = 0; i < buttons.length; i++)
{
   buttons[i].style.backgroundImage = "url('darkSquare.jpg')";
}​

The loop you used assign keys in a variable b. Since you didn't use the hasOwnProperty function, this loop can also yield other data you might not want.

You could also use the for-in loop as so

for(var b in buttons)
{
    if (buttons.hasOwnProperty(b))
        buttons[b].style.backgroundImage = "url('darkSquare.jpg')";
}​
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.