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I wrote my first VB WPF application recently to do some automated tasks with Quickbooks. It was a bit of a challenge because I had no prior experience with VB or Quickbooks. Among other things, I didn't understand the threading model and the problems I may encounter in the process. I basically wrote the entire application in 1 thread...the UI thread. I've come to understand that, while this "works", it creates problems with long-running tasks that halt the UI thread. I started looking into multi-threading and have now run into problems because I'm using UI bound ObservableCollections, which don't natively support updating the OC on a secondary thread. I found a number of posts on the topic, like this one from Mirality, and I will be looking into those next.

Before I undertake a massive rewrite of the whole application, I'm hoping there's an easier way to do what I'm trying to do. The ONLY reason I want to look at multi-threading is because I would like to show a "Loading..." window with or without task-specific messages (i.e. "Getting all vendors from Quickbooks...", etc), depending on what's easier. If there were a simple way to do a quick "task switch" to update the UI thread before continuing on with the other tasks that would probably solve my problem, but I don't know how to do that.

Here's a simple example to illustrate the problem. I have a custom application class that performs startup tasks in the AppStartup method.

Partial Public Class MyApp
    Inherits System.Windows.Application

    Private _qbclient As QBClient
    Private _vendorListWindow As VendorListWindow
    Private _splashScreen As StartupSplash

    '======================================================
    '   AppStartup Method
    '       Initialize the application
    '======================================================
    Public Sub AppStartup()
        _vendorListWindow = New VendorListWindow()
        _vendorListWindow.IsEnabled = False

        _splashScreen = New StartupSplash()
        _splashScreen.Owner = _vendorListWindow
        _splashScreen.Show()

        _splashScreen.progressMessage.Content = "Downloading all items from Quickbooks..."
        Me.GetQBClient().GetAllItems()

        _splashScreen.progressMessage.Content = "Downloading all vendors from Quickbooks..."
        Me.GetQBClient().GetAllVendors()

        _splashScreen.progressMessage.Content = "Locating vendors with items..."
        Me.GetQBClient().FlagVendorsWithItems()

        _splashScreen.progressMessage.Content = "Adding list filters..."
        _vendorListWindow.AddListFilters()

        _splashScreen.Close()
        _vendorListWindow.Show()
        _vendorListWindow.IsEnabled = True

    End Sub
End Class

In the above example, the StartupSplash is just a basic window with no framing that I use for a startup splash screen. At other times in the application I have another basic Loading window that essentially does the same thing but looks slightly different.

In either case, I see the splash screen but the content of the progressMessage text block never updates. Obviously, this is due to the fact that the UI thread is busy with the tasks I've asked it to do. In all cases, I return from a long-running task before calling the next, so there is ample time to push an update to the UI and then move on. Is this even possible or do I have to undertake the arduous task of multi-threading my application?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
it shouldn't be that "arduous". I'm not completely confident with my TPL abilities, but you could probably do: Task.Factory.StartNew([long running task 1]).ContinueWith([update text]).ContinueWith([long running task 2])... – jberger Feb 23 '12 at 15:38

In C#, but shouldn't be too hard to translate... Note that the Thread.Sleep functions simulate your long-running tasks. Also, with the TPL, you don't have to chain them together. You can start each long-running separately all at once (if they don't depend on one another).

using System.Threading.Tasks;

        txtProgress.Text = "Long-run 1";
        Task.Factory
            .StartNew(() => Thread.Sleep(2000))
            .ContinueWith(
                task => txtProgress.Text = "Long-run 2", TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext())
            .ContinueWith(task => Thread.Sleep(2000))
            .ContinueWith(
                task => txtProgress.Text = "Long-run 3", TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext())
            .ContinueWith(task => Thread.Sleep(2000))
            .ContinueWith(task => txtProgress.Text = "Done.", TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext())
        ;
share|improve this answer
    
also note that the updates to txtProgress.Text occur on the UI thread, because of TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() – jberger Feb 23 '12 at 16:09
    
I tried this approach but couldn't get it to work either. I'm not very familiar with C# (or VB, for that matter), so it could be lost in translation. Either way, I solved it using System.Windows.Forms (see my answer) – BrianVPS Feb 23 '12 at 20:30

If you know Windows Forms, you might know of the DoEvents() method, that usually processes messages so that your UI can update from time to time. WPF doesn't have that, but there is a workaround (converted from C#, hope this works):

Private Sub DoEvents()
    Dim f As New DispatcherFrame()
    Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, DirectCast(Function(arg As Object) Do
        Dim fr As DispatcherFrame = TryCast(arg, DispatcherFrame)
        fr.[Continue] = [True]
    End Function, SendOrPostCallback), f)
    Dispatcher.PushFrame(frame)
End Sub

You can call this between your operations, and the UI should process events and update with the pending changes. That still leaves your UI unresponsive while fetching the data though. But since it's a splashscreen, that might be acceptable for you.

share|improve this answer
    
While this should work, I have not been able to get it to work. In simple cases where you create a loop and sleep in the loop to simulate a delay and then continue on it seems to update (sometimes). In my real-life case, this doesn't. Perhaps I'm doing something wrong. Regardless, I solved it by including the System.Windows.Forms DLL into my application and using System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents(). This works flawlessly! I'll be answering this question with details. – BrianVPS Feb 23 '12 at 20:27

After much online searching and head scratching I have finally solved it. And it was pretty simple in the end. All you need to do is include the System.Windows.Forms DLL into your application references and then call the built-in System.Windows.Forms.Application.DoEvents() method. The frustrating part about all this is that there's very little good documentation about how to do things. The MSDN library is chock-full of technical information on what is available, but not so much how to use it. Hopefully this helps someone else in need of similar functionality.

Here's my code snippet from above, modified to work with System.Windows.Forms

Imports System.Windows.Forms 'This must be included in the assembly references...doesn't work otherwise

Partial Public Class MyApp
    Inherits System.Windows.Application

    Private _qbclient As QBClient
    Private _vendorListWindow As VendorListWindow
    Private _splashScreen As StartupSplash

    '======================================================
    '   AppStartup Method
    '       Initialize the application
    '======================================================
    Public Sub AppStartup()
        _vendorListWindow = New VendorListWindow()
        _vendorListWindow.IsEnabled = False

        _splashScreen = New StartupSplash()
        '_splashScreen.Owner = _vendorListWindow
        _splashScreen.Show()

        _splashScreen.progressMessage.Content = "Downloading all items from Quickbooks..."
        Me.GetQBClient().GetAllItems()
        Forms.Application.DoEvents()
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100) 'This is here so that the text shows up even if the step is really quick

        _splashScreen.progressMessage.Content = "Downloading all vendors from Quickbooks..."
        Me.GetQBClient().GetAllVendors()
        Forms.Application.DoEvents()
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100) 'This is here so that the text shows up even if the step is really quick

        _splashScreen.progressMessage.Content = "Locating vendors with items..."
        Me.GetQBClient().FlagVendorsWithItems()
        Forms.Application.DoEvents()
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100) 'This is here so that the text shows up even if the step is really quick

        _splashScreen.progressMessage.Content = "Adding list filters..."
        _vendorListWindow.AddListFilters()

        _splashScreen.Close()
        _vendorListWindow.Show()
        _vendorListWindow.IsEnabled = True

    End Sub
End Class
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