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I have the following classes and interfaces. I want to essentially freeze the IOld interface (which will be deprecated) and force users to use the INew interface which will contain the same methods as IOld. However INew method Meth3 represents the same functionality as IOld Meth2 but with a differing return type, and to distinguish them better I thought this design would be suitable. My question is, is this considered good coding practise?

NOTE: IOld and INew live in seperate assemblies. NewClass cannot reference IOld in any way since it will be exposed as a remoteable (MarshalByRef) object which clients will connect to via the INew interface. I don't want new clients referencing the IOld assembly.

public interface IOld
{
    void Meth1();
    double Meth2(int input);
} 

public interface INew
{
    void Meth1();
    float Meth3(int input);
} 

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public virtual void Meth1()
    {
    } 

    public virtual double Meth2(int input)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    } 
} 

public class OldClass
:
    BaseClass,
    IOld
{
    public override double Meth2(int input)
    {
        return 0;
    } 
} 

public class NewClass
:
    BaseClass,
    INew
{
    public float Meth3(int input)
    {
        return 0;
    } 
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd try something like this:

public class OldClass : BaseClass, IOld
{
    public override double Meth2(int input)
    {
        return 0.0;
    }
}

public class NewClass : OldClass, INew // now implements IOld and INew using the Method2() from OldClass
{
    [Obsolete("This method is deprecated . Use Method3() instead.")]
    public override double Meth2(int input)
    {
        return base.Meth2(input);
    }
    public float Meth3(int input)
    {
        return return 0.0f;
    }
}

It's considered better practice to flag a method as deprecated to inform the developer that they need to update their code than to break it by killing the old method.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - took the liberty of a little edit as well - soz!! :-) –  jim tollan Feb 23 '12 at 15:44
    
Thanks for your point; yes I will be marking the interface as deprecated but wanted to point out the basic design; A point I should have made is the NewClass cannot reference IOld in any way since it will be exposed as a remoteable object, and clients picking it up via the INew interface can't pull in the IOld assembly. I have updated my question accordingly. –  Jeb Feb 23 '12 at 15:53

Sit back down and build your pyramid with a solid base. The way you have set things up, the abstract base class and interface are competing methods of accomplishing the same concept. You are doing this primarily to facilitate Old versus New, but you end up with a rather funky dependency graph when you do this.

With what you have written, your only gotcha is methods with the same signature. If it were not for this issue, you could easily extend the old interface and not end up with issues. If that method changes in the new, is it a refactor change (acceptable) or a completely different result? In other words, can the old client call the new? If so, there is no need to have that method on a different interface either.

Make sure you deprecate the methods, so users are aware they are going to lose the old methods. Also make sure it is documented.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your point; No, the old client cannot call the new. A point I should have made is the NewClass cannot reference IOld in any way since it will be exposed as a remoteable object, and clients picking it up via the INew interface can't pull in the IOld assembly. –  Jeb Feb 23 '12 at 15:58
    
Are you using source control? Have the ability to branch? I ask because it sounds like old clients will continue to the use the old until the code is updated and new will always hit new. If that is true, you branch the code and keep the old in a maintenance branch and the new in a current branch. The maintenance branch is for bug fixes only. the last step is to make sure you have versioning thought out and simply give one client version 1 of the DLL and another version 2. The only gotcha is if a single client needs both for some period of time. If not, then it is just part of software change. –  Gregory A Beamer Feb 23 '12 at 16:11
    
Unfortunately we can't ask clients to recompile their code (it would cost them as usual!) unless a last resort, so we need to be backward compatible for IOld. However, we're not going to support IOld, and any bug fixes will be made to INew where we will advise them to recompile. Old clients will continue to use the old interface/new clients the new without any visibility of each other except on the server where it copes with the remote calls from remote clients through the 2 apis. –  Jeb Feb 23 '12 at 16:20
    
So, client A is going to update. Is there any potential of them only updating one method and then releasing, or will they completely move to the new interface? If they are going to make a full shift, then having two libraries (version 1 is old and version 2 is new) is still an option. The only exception where you HAVE TO have both interfaces in one class is if you are GACing the assemblies and even then you can play some config magic to keep the old client on the old version. I am not suggesting this is THE WAY, only that there are options if version is the issue. –  Gregory A Beamer Feb 23 '12 at 16:42
    
They will completely move to the new interface assembly. On a side note, the IOld assembly is actually GAC registered (also contains a COM interface using COMInterop), whereas the INew assembly (no COM) will not be, but will be strong named so I can still use publisher policy etc. to redirect old clients to the future new versions. –  Jeb Feb 23 '12 at 16:55

I would prefer to add a new method with little bit different name instead of creating new interface.

So the old interface would be for example:

public interface IOld
{
    void Meth1();
    [Obsolete("Use Meth22 instead.")]
    double Meth2(int input);
    float Meth22(int input);
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I've added a note at the end of my question meaning I'm not continuing with the IOld interface. –  Jeb Feb 23 '12 at 15:55

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