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$string = ":abc and :def have apples.";
$replacements = array('Mary', 'Jane');

should become:

Mary and Jane have apples.

Right now I'm doing it like this:

preg_match_all('/:(\w+)/', $string, $matches);

foreach($matches[0] as $index => $match)
   $string = str_replace($match, $replacements[$index], $string);

Can I do this in a single run, using something like preg_replace?

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1  
This is how you can do it with an associative array. –  Teneff Feb 23 '12 at 15:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could use preg_replace_callback with a callback that consumes your replacements one after the other:

$string = ":abc and :def have apples.";
$replacements = array('Mary', 'Jane');
echo preg_replace_callback('/:\w+/', function($matches) use (&$replacements) {
    return array_shift($replacements);
}, $string);

Output:

Mary and Jane have apples.
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the e modifier has been depreciated as of PHP v.5.5 –  Kareem Oct 25 at 6:44
1  
@Karim: Right, have removed it from the answer. Thanks for the pointer. –  hakre Oct 25 at 9:06
$string = ":abc and :def have apples.";
$replacements = array('Mary', 'Jane');

echo preg_replace("/:\\w+/e", 'array_shift($replacements)', $string);

Output:

Mary and Jane have apples.
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This won't work on the HHVM any workarounds? –  Mario May 1 at 11:23

For a Full array replacement by Associative Key you can use this to match your regex pattern:

$words=array("_saudation_"=>"Hello", "_animal_"=>"cat", "_animal_sound_"=>"MEooow");

$source=" _saudation_! My Animal is a _animal_ and it says _animal_sound_ ,  _no_match_";

echo (preg_replace_callback("/\b_(\w*)_\b/", function($match) use ($words) { if(isset($words[$match[0]])){
return ($words[$match[0]]);}else{
return($match[0]);} 
},  $source));

    //returns:  Hello! My Animal is a cat and it says MEooow ,  _no_match_

*Notice, thats although "_no_match_" lacks translation, it will match during regex, but preserve its key.

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