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I have read in many places that "getters and setters are evil". And I understood why so. But I don't know how to avoid them completely. Say Item is a class that has information about item name, qty, price etc... and ItemList is a class, which has a list of Items. To find the grand total:

int grandTotal()
{
int total = 0;

for (Item item: itemList)
       total += item.getPrice();

return total;
}

In the above case, how does one avoid getPrice()? The Item class provides getName, setName, etc....

How do I avoid them?

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Is your Item really anything more than raw data? –  Jerry Coffin Feb 23 '12 at 15:43
4  
Who says they're "evil"? Maybe the lazy people who don't want to write an extra 40 methods per class. I'd say making private variables public, is more "evil". –  Wes Feb 23 '12 at 15:44
1  
@Wes Getters/setters being evil and breaking encapsulation is a well-known case argued by Allen Holub in JavaWorld: Why getter and setter methods are evil. Before dismissing the concern, read about it -- it's not at all about the extra keystrokes. –  Andres F. Feb 23 '12 at 15:54
4  
@AndresF. I think the bigger issue is the down voting every answer because they didn't read or didn't agree with a specific article does not add value to the discussion. Downvote because they are wrong on a technical issue, or if they have failed to explain an opinion, but please try to keep the discussion civil and the expectations reasonable. @ the two people downvoting Andres other posts: Keep it on topic guys. There's no call to punish him on completely unrelated questions. If you expect him act civilly you should at least do the same yourselves. –  Jonathan Fingland Feb 23 '12 at 17:00
1  
@AndresF. I've come across his writing before, (his article on extends specifically) and while he makes some good points, he couches them in inflammatory language. Both the extends vs. contains and getters/setters subjects are important with lots of shades of gray so it is unfortunate to see his articles inspire these kinds of religious debates. Novice programmers are especially vulnerable to seeing absolutes and accepting them as gospel (so to speak). –  Jonathan Fingland Feb 23 '12 at 18:09

9 Answers 9

When should you use getters and setters?

Getters and setters are great for configuring or determining the configuration of a class, or retrieving data from a model

Getting the price of an item is an entirely reasonable use of a getter. That is data that needs to be available and may involve special considerations to protect the data by adding validation or sanitization to the setter.

You can also provide getters without setters. They do not have to come in pairs.

When shouldn't you use getters and setters?

Sometimes objects rely on internal properties that will never be exposed. For example, Iterators and internal collections. Exposing the internal collection could have dramatically negative and unexpected consequences.

Also, for example, let's say you are communicating via some HttpURLConnection. Exposing the setter for your HttpURLConnection means that you could end up with a very odd state should the connection be changed while waiting to receive data. This connection is something that should be created on instantiation or entirely managed internally.

Summary

If you have data that is for all intents and purposes public, but needs to be managed: use getters and setters.

If you have data that needs to be retrieved but under no circumstances should ever be changed: use a getter but not a setter.

If you have data that needs to be set for internal purposes and should never be publicly exposed (and cannot be set at instantiation): use a setter but not a getter (setter presumably prevents a second call affecting the internal property)

If you have something that is entirely internal and no other class needs to access it or change it directly, then use neither.

Don't forget that setters and getters can be private and even for internally managed properties, having a setter that manages the property may be desirable. For example, taking a connection string and passing it to the setter for HttpURLConnection.

Also note:

Allen Holub's article Why getter and setter methods are evil seems to be the source of OP's reasoning but, in my opinion, the article does a poor job of explaining its point.

Edit: Added summary
Edit 2: spelling corrections

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Your answer clarifies a bit better what Allen Holub's article generally was getting at. I was having a lot of trouble understanding its point, and the solution he was trying to provide in it's stead. –  Elias Mar 3 at 15:30

The following sample is a brilliant example of boilerplate setters and getters.

class Item{
  private double price;

  public void setPrice(final double price){
    this.price = price;
  }
  public double getPrice(){
    return this.price;
  }
}

Some coders think that this is called encapsulation, but in fact this code is exact equivalent of

class Item{
  public double price;
}

In both classes price is not protected or encapsulated, but the second class reads easier.

 class Item{
    private double price;

    public void setPrice(final double price){
      if(isValidPrice(price))
        this.price = price;
      else throw new IllegalArgumentException(price+" is not valid!");
    }

    public double getPrice(){
      return this.price;
    }
  }

This is a real encapsulation, the invariant of the class is guarded by the setPrice. My advice - don't write dummy getters and setters, use getters and setters only if they guard the invariant of your class

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1  
There's also scope for permissions control as per the proxy pattern. –  Matt Gibson Feb 23 '12 at 16:02
    
True. My example seems a little bit dumb in the context of some enterprise network which creates a proxies of injected classes (@EJBs or @Components or whatever). –  fiction Feb 23 '12 at 16:12
4  
The one problem is that you assume at the time of writing that you know all of the validation and error checking you want to do. The point of writing the simple case of the setter is that you can add argument transformations/validation/etc. later on without changing the call to someitem.setPrice(price). Adding Exceptions obviously creates knock-on effects, but that would be true in any event. –  Jonathan Fingland Feb 23 '12 at 16:12
2  
@Jonathan With modern IDEs, renaming or creating getters/setters is matter of seconds. And getter/setters allow more precise debugging. My point is that dummy getters/setters make the code harder to read. –  fiction Feb 23 '12 at 16:16
2  
@fiction: You can't change other people's code that uses your class in a matter of seconds. –  dan04 Feb 29 '12 at 22:08

I have read in many places that "getters and setters are evil".

Really? That sounds crazy to me. Many? Show us one. We'll tear it to shreds.

And I understood why so.

I don't. It seems crazy to me. Either your misunderstood but think you did understand, or the original source is just crazy.

But I don't know how to avoid them completely.

You shouldn't.

how to avoid getPrice?

See, why would you want to avoid that? How else are you suppose to get data out of your objects?

how to avoid them???

Don't. Stop reading crazy talk.

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1  
This seems to be the canonical article, but yes, it's crazy talk. –  SWeko Feb 23 '12 at 15:46
1  
Totally agree. For more info check out LBushkin's answer in this link stackoverflow.com/questions/1568091/why-use-getters-and-setters –  JustinW Feb 23 '12 at 15:46
2  
@Andres F.: Pardon? 1. It's on the OP to provide the context; I told the OP in my answer to provide the context so we can dissect it. 2. The OP is not tagged as Java. 3. The OP didn't link to the Holub article, downvoting someone for not reading it is asinine; I'd downvote your comment if I could. 4. No one sensible is teaching blindly writing of getters and setters. –  Jason Feb 23 '12 at 16:08
3  
@Jason Exposing object internals is bad OO style regardless of programming language. And you must provide a good quality answer, which you didn't -- I'm not downvoting you because I disagree, but because you didn't bother to research the issue and dismissed it as "crazy talk". A well-researched answer would have noted the design problem, and explained why in some cases breaking encapsulation is unavoidable. –  Andres F. Feb 23 '12 at 16:13
2  
@AndresF. While the article makes some good points, it is full of over the top assertions and is incredibly long-winded. He says "You shouldn't use accessor methods (getters and setters) unless absolutely necessary" on the last page. And he's right. He fails to give good examples which make his point significantly less clear. His central point is that you need to consider what the class is for and do that while exposing as little detail as possible about the internal workings. But the abysmal writing leads to cases like OP that are simply scared off of getters and setters all together –  Jonathan Fingland Feb 23 '12 at 16:22

It's a shame to see a small, vocal minority take a back lash against the whole "Getters and Setters" are evil debate. Firstly the article title is purposely provocative to draw you in, as should any blog post. I've in turn blogged about this before but I'll summarise the best I can here.

  • Getters and setters (accessors) are not evil
  • They are "evil" (unnecessary) most of the time however
  • Encapsulation is not just adding accessors around private fields to control change, after all there is no benefit to added get/set methods that just modify a private field
  • You should write as much code as possible with the principle of "Tell, Don't Ask"
  • You need to use accessors for framework code, DTOs, serialisation and so forth. Don't try to fight this.
  • You want your core domain logic (business objects) to be as property free as possible however. You should tell objects to do stuff, not check their internal state at will.

If you have a load of accessors you essentially violate encapsulation. For example:

class Employee
{
   public decimal Salary { get; set; }

   // Methods with behaviour...
}

This is a crap domain object, because I can do this:

me.Salary = 100000000.00;

This may be a simple example, but as anyone who works in a professional environment can attest to, if there is some code that is public people will make use of it. It would not be wrong for a developer to see this and start adding loads of checks around the codebase using the Salary to decide what do with the Employee.

A better object would be:

class Employee
{
   private decimal salary;

   public void GivePayRise()
   {
        // Should this employee get a pay rise.
        // Apply business logic - get value etc...
        // Give raise
   }

   // More methods with behaviour
}

Now we cannot rely on Salary being public knowledge. Anyone wanting to give a pay rise to employees must do this via this method. This is great because the business logic for this is contained in one place. We can change this one place and effect everywhere the Employee is used.

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1  
One question though: What if the payrise depends on other factors, like the amount of Employees in the company, or the status of the economy? Would you give the Employee knowledge of this information? Or would you (atleast, I would do it) delegate this to a different class? But if you would delegate, the only way for that class to know is to get the information from other classes? –  Stefan Hendriks Mar 1 '12 at 9:16
1  
I'm going to b honest here -- your example hurts yours case. There are numerous use cases where getting and setting salaries is desirable. Better to check constraints than simply eliminate the option. Does the user or object making the request have the authority to do so? In your example, you use empty getters and setters, which is fine for stubbing out functions you plan to expand on, but is entirely not the point of getters and setters. Use getters and setters when there needs to be data access or manipulation and there needs to be some management, validation, or sanitization going on. –  Jonathan Fingland Mar 1 '12 at 15:20
    
@JonathanFingland the first example is void of methods, but imagine there was logic associated with the class. In other words the example would have behavior. Getters/Setters with logic e.g. object cannot set this to a specific value usually hints at much more complex logic than simply Get/Set a value, hence it should be a method. –  Finglas Mar 1 '12 at 21:28
    
@StefanHendriks the example was just spur of the moment but following a DDD style of thinking a service or services would be involved yes. The point is that something would tell each employee to receive a pay rise, then each employee/service would do the right thing. They'd know how long they have worked, what level and so forth. –  Finglas Mar 1 '12 at 21:31
    
setSalary(salary) { //get session credentials; //check permissions; //update salary value; //log update } just an example obviously, but I think it gets the point across. Sometimes all you want to do is set the value in a managed way. Giving a pay raise is not necessarily a bad function, but it is not the same as setting the salary. –  Jonathan Fingland Mar 2 '12 at 18:15

getPrice() is accessing a private variable I'm assuming.

To answer your question directly, make the price variable public, and code something like (syntax may differ depending on language, use of pointers etc):

total += item.price;

However this is generally considered bad style. Class variables should generally remain private.

Please see my comment on the question.

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1  
-1 For not reading the article by Allen Holub. The alternative to using getters/setters is not to expose internal attributes, but to reconsider your design. –  Andres F. Feb 23 '12 at 15:59
5  
Pardon? Who cares if I didn't read some article on some website somewhere. There's shit written all over the Internet. He asked for an answer on "how do I" and I showed him a way "how". +1 IMHO. –  Wes Feb 23 '12 at 16:25
5  
@AndresF. That Article was not referenced at all when this answer was posted. The question didn't even refer to it, only your comment 4 minutes after this answer was posted made the first reference. Surely an expectation to have read it is unrealistic, a down-vote is definitely ridiculous. –  GaryJL Feb 23 '12 at 16:32

How to avoid getters and setters in Java? Use Project Lombok

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I didn't ask how to hide, I asked how to avoid. –  Surendhar Jun 16 '12 at 13:00

How to avoid getters and setters? Design classes that actually act upon the data they hold.

Getters lie about the data anyway. In the Item.getPrice() example, I can see I'm getting an int. But is the price in dollars or cents? Does it include tax(es)? What if I want to know the price in a different country or state, can I still use getPrice()?

Yes, this might be beyond the scope of what the system is designed to do, and yes, you might just end up returning a variable's value from your method, but advertising that implementation detail by using a getter weakens your API.

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Really? I don't think that. on the contrary the getters and setters help you to protect the consistense of the variables.

The importance of getters and setters is to provide protection to private attributes so that they can not be accessed directly for this it is best that you create a class with the attribute item in which you include the corresponding get and set.

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Please elaborate. –  Andres F. Feb 23 '12 at 16:18
    
The importance of getters and setters is to provide protection to private attributes so that they can not be accessed directly for this it is best that you create a class with the attribute item in which you include the corresponding get and set. –  Margge Feb 23 '12 at 17:25
    
Understood :) But consider fiction's reply: if you simply wrap every private attribute with a getter/setter pair, are you really "protecting" them? Or simply adding boilerplate? –  Andres F. Feb 23 '12 at 17:35
    
@Andres F.: But no one is advocating wrapping every private field with a public getter/setter. You're setting up a straw man that no one would support, and then tearing it down. So what? –  Jason Feb 23 '12 at 21:52
    
@Jason I know it's not what Margge said, I simply want her to elaborate. I was merely arguing that getters/setters, by themselves, do not really provide protection. Having a public property or having it private but wrapped in accessors is not so different. –  Andres F. Feb 23 '12 at 22:29

Use a helper class ShoppingCart. Item's method item.addTo(ShoppingCart cart) would add the price to the totalSum of the cart using shoppingCart.addItem(Item item, int price)

Dependency from Item to ShoppingCart isn't disadvantageous if the Items are meant to be items of ShoppingCarts.

In the case where Items live solely for the ShoppingCart and the Item class is small, I would more likely have the Item as an inner class of the ShoppingCart, so that the ShoppingCart would have access to the private variables of the items.

Other thoughts

It would also be possible, although quite unintuitive design, to have the Item class count the sum (item.calculateSum(List<Item> items)), since it can access the private parts of other items without breaking encapsulation.

To others wondering why the getters are bad. Consider the given example where the getPrice() returns integer. If you would want to change that to something better like BigDecimal at least or a custom money type with currency, then it wouldn't be possible since the return type int exposes the internal type.

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