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I have some different SELECT queries with same values. I want to use something like DECLARE but when I write a simple DECLARE it says that "INTO" is expected.

If I want only a "SELECT", how can I use this form witout "INTO"?

Simply I have two (or more) selects:

SELECT * FROM my_table1 WHERE column1=5 and column2=6;

and

SELECT * FROM my_table2 WHERE col1=5 and col2=6;

Now I want to declare a variable like var_col1 and var_col2 and use them in both select queries at the same time.

I thought this would work:

DECLARE
var_col1 number := 5;
var_vol2 number := 6;
BEGIN
SELECT * FROM my_table1 WHERE column1=var_col1 and column2=var_col2;
SELECT * FROM my_table2 WHERE col1=var_col1 and col2=var_col1;
/* and more SELECTs with var_col1 and var_col2 */
END;

But no chance... How is the way to do that without a procedure or function?

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Which SQL client are you using? –  a_horse_with_no_name Feb 23 '12 at 16:10
    
PL/SQL Developer –  Yasin Okumus Feb 23 '12 at 16:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you write select * from some_table; in SQL*Plus, SQL*Plus is acting as the client program, and does a lot of work for you, under the covers, in terms of the data being returned from the database, formatting it and displaying it.

As soon as you type DECLARE, you begin a PL/SQL block. Now, You're calling PL/SQL, and PL/SQL is calling SQL. As a result, you need to decide how to handle the data being returned from the SQL, in PL/SQL. The way to do that, is via an INTO clause and a variable to receive the output. Considering that, where would the output data from the SELECT go, if you don't provide an INTO clause? It has to go somewhere, right?

Hope that's clear.

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What's wrong with the value going back to the client exactly as if you had done the select without a declare block? –  Sorpigal Oct 1 '12 at 19:11

You're using PLSQL Developer, which has a choice of many different window types. If I recall correctly, the Command window is the one which is a SQL*Plus emulator. That being so this should work:

var n1 number 
var n2 number 

exec &&n1 := 5
exec &&n2 := 6

SELECT * FROM my_table1 WHERE column1=&&n1 and column2=&&n2 ; 
SELECT * FROM my_table2 WHERE col1&&n1 and col2=&&n2;

In other words, define two substitution variables, assign values to them and finally deploy them in all your queries.

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Very interestingly "var" is a keyword. But Pl/Sql Developer doesn't accept this all statement. So this code doesn't work. By the way, I can't find proper usage of "var" for plsql... –  Yasin Okumus Feb 24 '12 at 7:47
    
@YasinOkumus: var is not PL/SQL, it's a PL/SQL Developer feature. You need to look it up in the PL/SQL developer manual –  a_horse_with_no_name Feb 24 '12 at 8:10
    
Thank you, I meant PL/SQL Developer. –  Yasin Okumus Feb 24 '12 at 16:23

You have to select into your declared variables if you want to do it that way or set the columns. For example:

DECLARE
var_col1 number := 5;
var_vol2 number := 6;
BEGIN
   SELECT my_table1.var_col into var_col1 
     FROM my_table1 
    WHERE column1=var_col1 
      AND column2=var_col2;
--etc.....
END;

OR

DECLARE
    var_col1 number := 5;
    var_vol2 number := 6;
    BEGIN
       SELECT 5 into var_col1 
         FROM my_table1 
        WHERE column1=var_col1 
          AND column2=var_col2;
    --etc.....
    END;

EDIT: I should also add that you can also declare output Vvariables that you can use in SQL to return output to help with debugging etc. So you can do something like:

DECLARE
 out  varchar2(200);

And in your BEGIN statement do something like:

 dbms_output.put_line(out);

Which outputs some potential useful info (depending what you set out to).

share|improve this answer
1  
But I want to select all columns? –  Yasin Okumus Feb 23 '12 at 16:16
    
And I don't get, what is the purpose of "into" really? What does that mean for a DECLARE? –  Yasin Okumus Feb 23 '12 at 16:17
    
Then the answer you want is @Edurado Ivanec's solution. Where you set the value in the BEGIN clause –  northpole Feb 23 '12 at 16:17
    
To answer your question about the INTO, please read @Mark J. Bobak response. –  northpole Feb 23 '12 at 16:18
    
@YasinOkumus - It depends on how you're using it. In the case above it's copying values from a table into a variable. –  MatBailie Feb 23 '12 at 16:18

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