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Question on this JavaScript Syntax (“What Does This Do?”)

What is the purpose of this line of code: /xyz/.test(function(){xyz;}). I have seen it in many pieces of code, but never understood why it's there. What's its purpose? I know that it's a regex function and returns a boolean based on if a match was found.

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marked as duplicate by Esailija, LordZardeck, bernie, zzzzBov, Graviton Feb 24 '12 at 3:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
To test if function decompilation is supported –  Esailija Feb 23 '12 at 16:27
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@MikkoMaunu this is an EXACT duplicate, as that question is referring to the same script I got the question from. this probably should be deleted, but i can't now that there are answers. This should be closed then –  LordZardeck Feb 23 '12 at 16:33
    
I know, that's why I informed you about it. In this context I do not found any reasonable and commonly shared difference between definitions of "duplicate" and "EXACT duplicate". That's why I was not adding "EXACT". –  Mikko Maunu Feb 23 '12 at 16:40
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It checks the current environment for the ability to decompile functions. To be more specific: it calls the toString function of function(){xyz;} and tests the resulting string with a regular expression that searches for xyz. If the js environment supports function decompilation the test for xyz will succeed, otherwise it will give false

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That checks whether calling toString() on a function returns the actual code of the function.

/xyz/.test(something) returns true if something contains xyz.

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