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java.lang.String is declared as final, however are there any mechanisms available legitimate or otherwise to extend it and replace the equals(String other) method?

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4  
What are you hoping to achieve with this? –  NPE Feb 23 '12 at 18:14
1  
I was wondering about the same some time ago, and the only answer I got was to wrap a String to other class and use this other class instead. (un)fortunately, final class is a final class :) –  Benjamin Feb 23 '12 at 18:18
    
Making String final was a very deliberate decision on the part of the JDK's authors ;) –  Louis Wasserman Feb 23 '12 at 18:53
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From SCJP Book: If programmers were free to extend the String class, civilization - as we know it - could collapse. –  araknoid Aug 26 '13 at 21:44

3 Answers 3

No, absolutely not. If you want some "other" kind of string, create another type which might contain a string:

public final class OtherString {
    private final String underlyingString;

    public OtherString(String underlyingString) {
        this.underlyingString = underlyingString;
    }        

    // Override equals however you want here
}
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3  
But String s="hi"; is doable, but not OtherString s="hi"; –  everlasto Sep 13 '13 at 9:07
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@everlasto: Sure. You'd have to write OtherString s = new OtherString("hi"); –  Jon Skeet Sep 13 '13 at 9:30

I guess the closest you can come is making some class that implements CharSequence. Most JDK string manipulation methods accept a CharSequence. StringBuilder for example. Combined with a good implementation of toString(), the various methods of String and valueOf(), you can come pretty close to a natural substitute.

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You cannot extend a class that is marked as final. You can use composition to either put a String object inside or you can hand roll your own version. This can be accomplished via character arrays and the other magic that goes into creating String classes.

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