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after a hard work, my brain turns out of service.. (it is 11:40 P.M. in Turkey)

I am doing a rotation job.:

variables:

_cx = horizontal center of rect
_cy = vertical center of rect
_cos = cos value of current angle
_sin = sin value of current angle

to rotating any point in this rect :

function getx(x, y)
{
      return _cx + _cos * (x - _cx) - _sin * (y - _cy);
}
function gety(x, y)
{
      return _cy + _sin * (x - _cx) + _cos * (y - _cy);
}

I am trying to do resize given rectangle before rotation process to maximum size what fitted in original bounds.. how could I do?

thanks your advance

EDIT : Igor Krivokon's solution

The problem is solved by Igor Krivokon, and here is the modified version of that solution what works for every angle value

var h1:Number, h2:Number, hh:Number, ww:Number,
    degt:Number, d2r:Number, r2d:Number, deg:Number,
    sint:Number, cost:Number;
//@angle = given angle in radians
//@r is source/target rectangle
//@d2r is static PI / 180 constant for degree -> radian conversation
//@r2d is static 180 / PI constant for radian -> degree conversation
d2r = 0.017453292519943295769236907683141;
r2d = 57.295779513082320876798154814105;
deg = Math.abs(angle * r2d) % 360;
if(deg < 91)
{
    degt = angle;
}else if(deg < 181){
    degt = (180 - deg) * d2r;
}else if(deg < 271){
    degt = (deg - 180) * d2r;
}else{
    degt = (360 - deg) * d2r;
}

sint = Math.sin(degt);
cost = Math.cos(degt);

h1 = r.height * r.height / (r.width * sint + r.height * cost);
h2 = r.height * r.width / (r.width * cost + r.height * sint);
hh = Math.min(h1, h2);
ww = hh * r.width / r.height;
r.x = (r.width - ww) * .5;
r.y = (r.height - hh) * .5;
r.height = hh;
r.width = ww;

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Quick clarification, you have a rectangle R and you want to rotate and scale it about its center to produce a rectangle R' that takes up as much of the area in R as possible? – Kevin Loney Jun 2 '09 at 21:02
    
Hi Tolgahan, You cannot posibly answer this without knowing at least the relationship between the sides of the rectangle. – tekBlues Jun 2 '09 at 21:06
    
Yes, and i want to have R' before rotating – Tolgahan Albayrak Jun 2 '09 at 21:07
    
@tekBlues : Hi, we have all information about rectangle and rotation, i mean, left, top, right, bottom and angle, so we have width and height – Tolgahan Albayrak Jun 2 '09 at 21:12
2  
11:40 pm in Turkey? You should move from Turkey to somewhere where it's earlier. – Nosredna Jun 2 '09 at 21:41
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If your original sizes where h and w, and you turned is by angle phi, try to calculate the new height

h1 = h*h / (w*sin(phi) + h*cos(phi))

and

h2 = h*w / (w*cos(phi) + h*sin(phi))

And pick the hew height h' as the smallest of h1 and h2.

Then, obviously, new width w' = h' * w / h.

Please try it - I didn't have time to test my math :)

share|improve this answer
    
your formula is ok if angle a => 0 >= a <= 90, now i am trying other variations of this way – Tolgahan Albayrak Jun 2 '09 at 21:46
    
I don't know how, but that works super sweet. Thanks! – Budius Nov 19 '14 at 10:49

divide the rect into 4 smaller rectangles. cut this in half diagonally (before rotation, from a corner to a center point) and you will have 8 triangles. You only need 4 of them. After your rotation, the hypotenuse of these triangles are sticking out of the original bounds box.

determine a formula for the hypotenuse (you have the original angle, 45, -45, 135, -135, and the starting point, so that's mx+b), transform those lines (modify their slopes by adding the rotation), intersect those lines with the boundary walls (y = 0, y = w, x = 0, x = h, distance formula, test for infinite cases) & figure out which hypotenuse is shortest (center to wall, at the corner). Since all the hypotenuse were the same length to start with, just resize all of them to this new value, you have your new rectangle.

Am I doing it right?

share|improve this answer
    
i guess, it should have an easier way :) – Tolgahan Albayrak Jun 2 '09 at 21:48
    
i can't imagine how :) though I could have rephrased it "figure out how far the longest sticking-out-corner sticks out, and resize it" – ryansstack Jun 2 '09 at 22:38
function resize_factor()
{
    /* Find how far the upper-left corner sticks up beyond the top */
    overtop = gety(0, 0);
    /* Compute a vertical resize factor that would put that point at the top */
    /* (be sure to use floating point arithmetic) */
    vertical_resize = _cy / (_cy - overtop);

    /* Do the same for the lower-left corner sticking out beyond the left */
    /* (using 2*_cy for the height of the rectangle) */
    overleft = getx(0, 2*_cy);    
    horizontal_resize = _cx / (_cx - overleft);

    /* Return whichever resize constraint is stricter */
    return min(vertical_resize, horizontal_resize);
}

function resize_x(x)
{
    /* To get location of a point, after resize, before rotation... */
    /* ...multiply its resize factor by its distance from the center. */
    return resize_factor()*(x - _cx) + _cx;
}

function resize_y(y)
{
    return resize_factor()*(y - _cy) + _cy;
}

/* These resized coordinates can be used inside any other code you want: */
function getx_after_resize_and_rotate(x, y)
{
    return getx( resized_x(x), resized_y(y) );
}

Notes: This code assumes the angle is rotating clockwise by less than 90 degrees (because that's what your pictures show). If your angle is something else, you might have to check all 4 corners and determine which ones are the furthest overtop and overleft.

share|improve this answer
    fitRect: function( rw,rh,radians ){
            var x1 = -rw/2,
                x2 = rw/2,
                x3 = rw/2,
                x4 = -rw/2,
                y1 = rh/2,
                y2 = rh/2,
                y3 = -rh/2,
                y4 = -rh/2;

            var x11 = x1 * Math.cos(radians) + y1 * Math.sin(radians),
                y11 = -x1 * Math.sin(radians) + y1 * Math.cos(radians),
                x21 = x2 * Math.cos(radians) + y2 * Math.sin(radians),
                y21 = -x2 * Math.sin(radians) + y2 * Math.cos(radians), 
                x31 = x3 * Math.cos(radians) + y3 * Math.sin(radians),
                y31 = -x3 * Math.sin(radians) + y3 * Math.cos(radians),
                x41 = x4 * Math.cos(radians) + y4 * Math.sin(radians),
                y41 = -x4 * Math.sin(radians) + y4 * Math.cos(radians);

            var x_min = Math.min(x11,x21,x31,x41),
                x_max = Math.max(x11,x21,x31,x41);

            var y_min = Math.min(y11,y21,y31,y41);
                y_max = Math.max(y11,y21,y31,y41);

            return [x_max-x_min,y_max-y_min];
        }
share|improve this answer

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