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To learn RoR I started using the excellent Rails Tutorial. So far so good, although I noticed the RSpec tests are quickly becoming a confused mess. Below is a sample of the integration tests for sessions_controller.rb. It will only get longer as I continue along.

Is there a logical way to separate and break down these tests into smaller chunks? How would you go about it and based on what criteria? Examples would be most welcome.

Example:

require 'spec_helper'

describe "AuthenticationPages" do
  subject { page }

  describe "signin" do
    before { visit signin_path }

    it { should have_selector('h1',  text: 'Sign in') }
    it { should have_selector('title', text: full_title('Sign in')) }

    describe "with invalid information" do
      before { click_button "Sign in" }

      it { should have_selector('title', text: full_title('Sign in')) }
      it { should have_selector('div.flash.error', text: 'Invalid') }
      it { should_not have_link('Profile', href: signout_path ) }
      it { should_not have_link('Settings', href: edit_user_path) }

      describe "after visiting another page" do
        before { click_link "Home" }
        it { should_not have_selector('div.flash.error') }
      end
    end

    describe "with valid information" do
      let(:user) { FactoryGirl.create(:user) }
      before do
        fill_in "Email",   with: user.email
        fill_in "Password",  with: user.password
        click_button "Sign in"
      end

      it { should have_selector('title', text: user.name) }
      it { should have_link('Profile', href: user_path(user)) }
      it { should have_link('Settings', href: edit_user_path(user)) }
      it { should have_link('Users', href: users_path) }
      it { should have_link('Sign out', href: signout_path) }

      it { should_not have_link('Sign in', href: signin_path) }

      describe "visiting the sign up page" do
        before { visit sign_up_path }
        it { should_not have_selector('h1', text: 'Sign Up') }
        it { should_not have_selector('title', text: full_title('Sign Up')) }
      end

      describe "submitting to the create action" do
        before { post users_path(user) }
        specify { response.should redirect_to(user_path(user)) }
      end

      describe "followed by signout" do
        before { click_link "Sign out" }
        it { should have_link('Sign in') }
      end
    end
  end

  describe "authorization" do

    describe "for non-signed-in users" do
      let(:user) { FactoryGirl.create(:user) }

      describe "in the users controller" do

        describe "visiting the edit page" do
          before { visit edit_user_path(user) }
          it { should have_selector('title', text: 'Sign in') }
        end

        describe "submitting to the update action" do
          before { put user_path(user) }
          specify { response.should redirect_to(signin_path) }
        end
      end

      describe "visiting user index" do
        before { visit users_path }
        it { should have_selector('title', text: 'Sign in') }
      end

      describe "when attempting to visit a protected page" do
        before do
          visit edit_user_path(user)
          sign_in user
        end

        describe "after signing in" do
          it "should render the desired protected page" do
            page.should have_selector('title', text: 'Edit user')
          end

          describe "when signing in again" do
            before do
              visit signin_path
              sign_in user
            end

            it "should render the default (profile) page" do
              page.should have_selector('title', text: user.name)
            end
          end
        end
      end
    end

    describe "as wrong user" do
      let(:user)        { FactoryGirl.create(:user) }
      let(:wrong_user)  { FactoryGirl.create(:user, email: "wrong@example.com") }
      before            { sign_in user }

      describe "visiting users#edit page" do
        before { visit edit_user_path(wrong_user) }
        it { should have_selector('title', text: 'Sample App') }
      end

      describe "submitting a PUT request to the users#update action" do
        before { put user_path(wrong_user) }
        specify { response.should redirect_to(root_path) }
      end
    end

    describe "as non-admin user" do
      let(:user) { FactoryGirl.create(:user) }
      let(:non_admin) { FactoryGirl.create(:user) }

      before { sign_in non_admin }

      describe "submitting a DELETE request to the Users#destroy action" do
        before { delete user_path(user) }
        specify { response.should redirect_to(root_path) }
      end
    end
  end
end
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, seeing as you use already RSpec with shoulda (is that right?), I think you've achieved a high level of readability and manageability. You could always split this spec into smaller parts, but you have to ask yourself is splitting test code for one controller really necessary? You have many describe section which are good themselves at structuring tests. If anything fails, RSpec will always give you the exact line number so you can jump right into it and fix it.

As for extra readability, I'm noticing your use of blank lines after describe sections. Some people like to also insert blank lines before the end statements. I also recommend writing what block you are ending with the end statement, like this:

describe "GET /posts" do
#[...]
end #     GET /posts

With sections structured like this, there's also a good feature in many editors that allows for code shrinking inside that blocks by hiding code and showing the end just after describe. I believe you will sort this one on your own. I never thought about extra readability or anything beyond basics and I can manage the tests I've written quite all right.

Hope that convinces you that you already have a great way to organize your code. I don't think that splitting tests targeting the same functionality/object/target makes any sense just to keep it under < 100 lines or so.

Update

I have recently read an article in which DHH states that RSpec is needlessly complex and that test/unit is readable and easy to maintain. I thought you might want to know that.

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1  
<updated with dhh's article, notification-comment> –  farnoy Mar 1 '12 at 14:57

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