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I have a class with a Dictionary<string, T> private field (users), where the string key represents the username. I wrote some methods for this class, for example the GetValue(string userid) method returns the T object which is associated to the specified username.

I would handle the exceptions that may occur in this class and that are caused by the Dictionary. For example:

  • if the specified key is null, the Dictionary throws an ArgumentNullException;
  • if the specified key does not exist in the Dictionary, it throws a KeyNotFoundException.

The first approach could be to catch the exceptions thrown by the Dictionary and re-throw the same exceptions or throw custom exceptions.

public T GetValue(string userid)
{
    try
    {
        return users[userid];
    }
    catch(ArgumentNullException ex1)
    {
        // re-throw the same exception
    }
    catch(KeyNotFoundException ex2)
    {
        throw new UserIdNotFoundException("The specified userid does not exist.", ex2);   // custom exception
    }
}

The second approach could be to avoid catching exceptions, but check the conditions that cause them and throw appropriate exceptions.

public T GetValue(string userid)
{
    if (userid != null)
    {
        if(users.ContainsKey(userid))
            return users[userid];
        else throw new UserIdNotFoundException("The specified userid does not exist.", ex2);   // custom exception
    }
    else throw new ArgumentNullException(...);
}

The third approach is similar to the second one, but it uses the TryGetValue method of the Dictionary.

public T GetValue(string userid)
{
    if (userid != null)
    {
        T value;
        if(users.TryGetValue(userid, out value))
            return value;
        else throw new UserIdNotFoundException("The specified userid does not exist.", ex2);   // custom exception
    }
    else throw new ArgumentNullException(...);
}

What are the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches? The best practices for handling exceptions say that:

If the event is truly exceptional and is an error, using exception handling is better because less code is executed in the normal case... If the event happens routinely, using the programmatic method to check for errors is better...

In my case the GetValue(string userid) method would be invoked rarely, but potential users of the class may use it very frequently.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When there is a practical and performant way to avoid an exception in the underlying data type, it's probably a good idea to do so, even if you'll end up throwing an exception yourself. Using TryGetValue is almost always the right way to fetch something from a dictionary that may or may not contain a particular item.

Beyond that, your inner method calls throw exceptions and you know what they mean, it's often best to wrap them in your own exceptions unless you are certain all such exceptions will always have the same semantic meaning any time they occur in code you call. Otherwise, suppose that when an attempt is made to add a duplicate user, Dictionary throws ArgumentException. If you let that percolate out as an ArgumentException rather than wrapping it as something else, and later on it becomes possible for code somewhere within your AddUser method to throw an ArgumentException for something else, it may be difficult for you to help your caller distinguish between an ArgumentException caused by a duplicate user, versus an ArgumentException which occurs for some other reason.

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It depends on the intended purpose of your class. If your class is to act as a Dictionary wrapper, for instance, it might be beneficial to the clients to propagate similar error/exception behavior of a typical Dictionary. If your class is implementing something more complex (most likely), I would say you are better off presenting your own errors to the caller. As far as which approach to take, do the same input validation you would do on normal Dictionary interaction. In other words, if you would typically check for ContainsKey or TryGetValue before adding to the Dictionary, continue to do so here, but then there is no need to throw a new exception. Instead report the error back to the caller in terms they may understand. They shouldn't have to know that you are using a Dictionary under the hood.

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ContainsKey and TryGetValue both method can avoid throwing the KeyNotFoundException

Diffrence between ContainsKey approach which only checks weather key is present or not and than get the value , but the TryGetValue not only check key is present or not but also get the value for that key.

TryGetValue approach is easy to use than ContainsKey approach but only when you want to check the key in collection and also want to get the value associated with it. If you only want to check the key is present or not use ContainsKey only.

Read more : Dictionary Object (ContainsKey Vs. TryGetValue) might help you .

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The third implementation is the best, because it is the fastest and the shortest.

The second implementation is sub-optimal: it accesses the dictionary twice, once to check for existence and a second time to get the value.

The first implementation is the worst:

  • It is not functionally equivalent in case the argument is null.
  • It receives a performance penalty from the try statement - the compiler will have to setup some data on the stack obviously.
  • There is also a style issue, in my opinion, with programs making a large use of catch statements. The best thing to do with exceptions is often to let them bubble up until they can be logged or something can be done about them.
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