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I have been thinking about this for a while and cannot come up with a solution. I have data in column X that I want to use to create the data in column Z. I want Z to be all 1's up to the point where there are two 0's in a row in X, then all zeros after that. Also, in column W I want the final elements to be 1's when looking at Y from the bottom up, Y contains two 0's in a row. Hope that makes sense. I have put in column Z and column W how they should end up looking. I am trying to use indexing, but I am having a hard time figuring out how to reference the rows from column X that come after the row where the value for Z will be (because the value in row 1 of Z is based on the values of rows 2 and 3 in X). These should be two separate functions, one to look at the beginning and one to look at the end. They will both be aplplied to each row separately, so column X will produce two columns, Z as below, as well as another column which in this case would be all 0's. Thanks for any help!

****** I changed the column names from A B C D to X Y Z W to avoid confusion. Sorry, wasn't thinking of that as I typed it up!

********** I really would like to be able to do this without functions or loops, just using indexing. I think I could figure it out using a function, but since it is a large data set I want it to be as quick as possible.

code    X   Y   Z   W
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   0   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   0   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   1   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   1   1   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   1   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   1   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   1   0   0   0
B   0   1   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   1   0   1
B   0   1   0   1
B   0   1   0   1
B   0   0   0   1
B   0   1   0   1
B   0   1   0   1

The following function used with aggregate should give the results I am looking for. Thanks to Tyler for beginning the function. I still feel there should be a simpler way to do this, but for now this should do. Thanks to everyone for your input!

I think I got it figured out, based on Tyler's code, just with a few changes. I will just apply this function using aggregate and it should all work out. Thanks for all the input!

pat.finder <- function(var, value=0, fill1=1, fill2=0, rev=FALSE, seq=2){

 if(var[1]==0 & rev==FALSE){

 j<- rep(0,length(var))} else if(var[length(var)]==0 & rev == TRUE){

 j<- rep(0,length(var))} else{

 x <- if(rev) rle(rev(var)) else rle(var)
 n <- which(x[[1]]>(seq-1) & x[[2]]==value)[1]-1
 i <- sum(x[[1]][1:n])
 j <- if(rev){
            rev(c(rep(fill1, i), rep(fill2, length(var)-i)))
       } else {
            c(rep(fill1, i), rep(fill2, length(var)-i))
       }
}

 return(j)
} 
share|improve this question
    
I'd have a look at rollapply() in the zoo package. Something like which(rollapply(zoo(DF$A, width=2, function(X) all(X==0))))[1] (untested) will get you the index of the first element of A that is 0 and is followed by a 0. –  Josh O'Brien Feb 23 '12 at 20:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's probably a faster way but this is what I came up with:

dat <- read.table(text="code    A   B   C   D #read in your data
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   0   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   0   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   1   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
A   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   1   1   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   1   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   1   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   1   0   0   0
B   0   1   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   0   0   0
B   0   1   0   1
B   0   1   0   1
B   0   1   0   1
B   0   0   0   1
B   0   1   0   1
B   0   1   0   1", header=T)

Now the code:

A.rle <- rle(dat$A)
n <- which(A.rle[[1]]>1 & A.rle[[2]]==0)[1]-1
i <- sum(A.rle[[1]][1:n])
dat$C <- c(rep(1, i), rep(0, nrow(dat)-i))

B.rle <- rle(rev(dat$B))
n2 <- which(B.rle[[1]]>1 & B.rle[[2]]==0)[1]-1
i2 <- sum(B.rle[[1]][1:n2])
dat$D <- rev(c(rep(1, i2), rep(0, nrow(dat)-i2)))

EDIT: I don't fully understand what you want I think so I've tried to create a function that is versatile to your needs. Use rev=TRUE to look at the end:

pat.finder <- function(var, value=0, fill1=1, fill2=0, rev=FALSE, seq=2){
    x <- if(rev) rle(rev(var)) else rle(var)
    n <- which(x[[1]]>(seq-1) & x[[2]]==value)[1]-1
    i <- sum(x[[1]][1:n])
    j <- if(rev){
               rev(c(rep(fill1, i), rep(fill2, length(var)-i)))
          } else {
               c(rep(fill1, i), rep(fill2, length(var)-i))
          }
    return(j)
}

#TRY IT OUT
pat.finder(dat$B, rev=TRUE)

transform(dat, C=pat.finder(A), D = pat.finder(B, rev=TRUE)) #what I think you want

transform(dat, C=pat.finder(A, fill1='foo', fill2='bar'), 
    D = pat.finder(A, rev=TRUE))

transform(dat, C=pat.finder(A, value=1), D = pat.finder(B, rev=TRUE))
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, sorry I was editing and then reached the time limit: Thanks for the start, the only problem is there are nearly 500 different possibilities in the "code" column so I need a way to reference that part of the data alone without creating separate variables for each one (and I want to avoid doing a loop). This is what I have currently, where C is initially just a column of 0's. But, obviously this is not working. C[A[as.numeric(rownames(A))+1] != 1 & A[as.numeric(rownames(A))+2] != 1] <- 1 I need something other than rownames(), just not sure what. –  user1228982 Feb 23 '12 at 19:50
    
@user1228982 -- If you'd like to, you can always delete one of your previous comments (as I'll do with this one once you've gotten it). Cheers, and welcome to SO! –  Josh O'Brien Feb 23 '12 at 19:59
    
I think after I put this into a function it should meet your needs. I used it in transform as this is easier and less code but you could use the function isolating each column:pat.finder(var, value=0, fill1=1, fill2=0, rev=FALSE, seq=2). The var is your column, value is the pattern you're looking for, fill1 is what you want to fill the first part of the string with, fill2 does the same to the second half, rev gives you the ability to look at the back end of the column instead, and seq tells how many repeats of the pattern you're looking for. –  Tyler Rinker Feb 23 '12 at 20:11
    
Thanks @TylerRinker, your pat.finder function is working if the column starts with a 1 to fill column Z (or C from my original naming), however when the column does not start with 1, Z (C) is filled with all 1's. Once that is figured out, I will just use an aggregate to get what I need. –  user1228982 Feb 23 '12 at 22:13

Consider sum(dat$A[i:(i+1)]) . That is zero iff you have two zeroes in a row. Either use a loop (or lapply) or one of those running functions to find the minimum "i" that returns a zero, and you've found where to "toggle" column C from 1 to zero.

But I really have to ask: "What is the problem you are trying to solve?" I can almost guarantee if you tell us where the data in columns A and B came from, we can show you a much more direct way to identify the breakpoints you are setting up in columns C and D.

PS: once a solution is set up for dat$C, just do the same but looping downwards from "imax" to 1 to get dat$D

share|improve this answer
    
Basically, the data in columns X and Y are indicating if a value associated with A is less than the first quartile of the data associated with A. Also, X is only giving a value of 1 if the date for that particular row is greater than a certain date. Column X is basically looking for "new" items. Column Y only gives a 1 if the date for that particular row is less than a certain date. Column Y is basically looking for items that have been discontinued. Columns Z and W are there to further refine this process by creating a vector that has a better defined pattern. Perfectly clear, right? –  user1228982 Feb 23 '12 at 21:16

Suppose that the data frame shown in the question is DF. Then the ith element of the result of pmax is 0 if the ith and next elements of x are 0 and the ith element of the result is 1 otherwise. We append a 1 on the end since the last element of 'x' has no next element. We then compare that to 0 and cummin then moves the first 0 found by this process onwards.

two0 <- function(x) cummin(c(pmax(x[-1], x[-length(x)]), 1) != 0)
DF.out <- transform(DF, Z = two0(X), W = rev(two0(rev(Y))))

The !=0 makes the result of two0 integer. If we wish we can drop it in which case the result will be numeric.

EDIT: clarified integer/numeric aspect.

share|improve this answer
    
smoother solution than mine. –  Carl Witthoft Feb 23 '12 at 22:45

This might work for your needs (only does column A). If you can be more specific about what exactly you are looking for, the board can help further.

## read in your data
df1 = read.table(text="code    A   B   C   D 
A   1   0   1   0
A   1   0   1   0
...
")

## create forward-lagged A column
require(taRifx)
df1$lagA = shift(df1$A,wrap=F,pad=T)

myfun1 = function(x,y) {
     BB = x + y
     BB = ifelse(BB > 0, 1, 0)
     BB
}

df1$A2 = apply(df1[,c(2,6)], 1, function(x,y) myfun1(x[1],x[2]))
tvec = rep(1,which(df1$A2 == 0)[1] -1)
bvec = vector(length = nrow(df1) - which(df1$A2 == 0)[1] + 1, mode="numeric")

## the column you are looking for:
df1$nA = c(tvec,bvec)
share|improve this answer
    
You may find the shift function in the taRifx package to be helpful for this. If your flagum function does what I think it does, shift can do the same thing and more. –  Ari B. Friedman Feb 23 '12 at 20:42
    
Cool; thanks. I could then replace the code above to read df1$lagA = shift(df1$A,wrap=F,pad=T). –  baha-kev Feb 23 '12 at 22:24
    
Yup. That's the idea. –  Ari B. Friedman Feb 23 '12 at 23:21

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