Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class that defines a protected field. The protected field has a field initializer.

When I deserialize the concrete class, the field initializer is not run. Why? What is the best pattern to solve the problem? If I move the initialization into a constructor, the constructor is also not invoked.

[DataContract]
public class MyConcrete
{
    // FIELD INITIALIZER DOES NOT RUN WHEN COMMENTED IN:
    protected readonly Dictionary<int, string> myDict;// = new Dictionary<int, string>();

    public MyConcrete()
    {
        myDict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
    }

    private bool MyMethod(int key)
    {
        return myDict.ContainsKey(key);
    }

    private int myProp;

    [DataMember]
    public int MyProp
    {
        get { return myProp; }
        set { bool b = MyMethod(value); myProp = value; } // Call MyMethod to provoke error
    }
}

ORIGINAL CLASS HIERARCHY

[DataContract]
public abstract class MyAbstract
{
    // THIS INITIALIZER IS NOT RUN WHILE DESERIALIZING:
    protected readonly Dictionary<int, string> myDict = new Dictionary<int, string>();

    private bool MyMethod(int key)
    {
        return myDict.ContainsKey(key);
    }

    private int myProp;

    [DataMember]
    public int MyProp
    {
        get { return myProp; }
        set { bool b = MyMethod(value); myProp = value; } // Call MyMethod to provoke error
    }
}

[DataContract]
public class MyConcrete : MyAbstract
{

}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string tempfn = Path.GetTempFileName();

        MyConcrete concrete = new MyConcrete() { MyProp = 42 };
        string data = concrete.SerializeToString<MyConcrete>();

        MyConcrete rehydrated = SerializationHelper.DeserializeFromString<MyConcrete>(data);
    }
}

SUPPORTING METHODS

static public string SerializeToString<T>(this T obj)
{
    return SerializationHelper.SerializeToString<T>(obj);
}

static public string SerializeToString<T>(T obj)
{
    DataContractSerializer s = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(T));
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        s.WriteObject(ms, obj);
        ms.Position = 0;
        using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(ms))
        {
            string serialized = sr.ReadToEnd();
            return serialized;
        }
    }            
}

static public T DeserializeFromString<T>(string serializedDataAsString)
{
    DataContractSerializer s = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(T));
    using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(serializedDataAsString)))
    {
        object s2 = s.ReadObject(ms);
        return (T)s2;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Tried adding a protected constructor in the abstract where you initialize the dict? Provide a public constructor in MyConcrete that chains to : base(). –  Will Feb 23 '12 at 19:27
    
I flattened this into just one class and added a constructor. The constructor is not being invoked. Found this related post that claims field initializers and constructors are not invoked... stackoverflow.com/questions/5021973/… –  Eric J. Feb 23 '12 at 19:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 22 down vote accepted

On deserialization neither the constructors nor the field initializers are called and a "blank" un-initialized object is used instead.

To resolve it you can make use of the OnDeserializing or OnDerserialized attributes to have the deserializer call a function with the following signature:

void OnDeserializing(System.Runtime.Serialization.StreamingContext c);

In that function is where you can initialize whatever was missed within the deserialization process.

In terms of convention, I tend to have my constructor call a method OnCreated() and then also have deserializating method call the same thing. You can then handle all of the field initialization in there and be sure it's fired before deserialization.

[DataContract]
public abstract class MyAbstract
{
    protected readonly Dictionary<int, string> myDict;

    protected MyAbstract()
    {
        OnCreated();
    }

    private void OnCreated()
    {
        myDict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
    }

    [OnDeserializing]
    private void OnDeserializing(StreamingContext c)
    {
        OnCreated();
    }

    private bool MyMethod(int key)
    {
        return myDict.ContainsKey(key);
    }

    private int myProp;

    [DataMember]
    public int MyProp
    {
        get { return myProp; }
        set { bool b = MyMethod(value); myProp = value; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I cannot assign a readonly field from the OnDeserializing() method... this design choice for the serializer breaks the ability to use readonly... Still, seems to be the best/only approach. –  Eric J. Feb 23 '12 at 19:51
    
Oh yeah... You're right about the readonly. Woops, missed that one! –  Reddog Feb 23 '12 at 22:57
    
@Reddog +1 Thanks for this solution, I can live without readonly –  surfen Apr 2 '12 at 18:49
    
Read-only fields are still possible with reflection: stackoverflow.com/a/12398681/135138 –  Tim Sylvester Sep 13 '12 at 2:38
1  
@TimSylvester: Almost everything is possible via reflection :-) Sad that the language designers would force an object designer to use reflection to ensure an object is always properly initialized. –  Eric J. Feb 6 '13 at 15:49

Another approach is to access your field through a protected (in your example) property, and initialise the field using the null-coalescing (??) operator

protected Dictionary<int, string> myDict = new Dictionary<int, string>(); 

protected Dictionary<int, string> MyDict
{
    get
    {
        return myDict ?? (myDict = new Dictionary<int, string>());
    }
}

The downsides are that you lose the benefits of readonly, and need to make sure that you only access the value via the property.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, provides semantics similar to readonly as long as all developers that work on the class understand the convention of accessing MyDict instead of myDict. Somewhere that will cause a bug to happen, but an option appropriate to some circumstances. –  Eric J. Feb 6 '13 at 15:53
1  
That will bring lazyness to you class - for readonly properties it is cool. –  EvgeniyK Sep 28 '13 at 8:04
    
Why not remove the field initializer altogether? No reason to create the dictionary until you need it. –  probackpacker Apr 28 at 16:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.