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this example shows my problem. I'm using VB.net 2010

Public Class Form1

    Public Class BonoType
        Public name As String
    End Class

    Private tory As New List(Of BonoType)
    Private tory1 As New List(Of BonoType)   

    Private Sub Form1_Load(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
    End Sub

    Private Sub Button1_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
        Dim gg As New BonoType
        gg.name = "Boopsy"
        tory.Add(gg)
        gg = New BonoType
        gg.name = "Dipsy"
        tory.Add(gg)

        tory1 = tory
        Label1.Text = tory1(0).name
        Label2.Text = tory1(1).name     
    End Sub

    Private Sub Button2_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button2.Click
        tory(1).name = "Goose"
        Label1.Text = tory1(0).name
        Label2.Text = tory1(1).name
        TextBox1.Text = tory(1).name
    End Sub
End Class

What happens is "Goose" is not only stored in tory(1) but also in tory1(1), how can I stop this.

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2 Answers 2

i believe your problem lies here

   tory1 = tory

you are setting tory1 equal to tory. Its kind of hard to follow what you are trying to acomplish but it would appear to me that they are actually binded together. You might want to consider

 var thisTory = new tory
 Label1.Text = thisTory(0).name
 Label2.Text = tory1(1).name
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Tory and Tory1 were created as New List(0f BonoType) –  user1229283 Mar 9 '12 at 2:13

I think the problem is that with tory1=tory, you're just creating a reference back to the original object. You need to create a new object instead.

I.e., in VB:

Dim tory as New List(of String);
Dim tory2 as List(of String)

Then, when you want to copy tory2:

tory2 = New List(of String)(tory)

c#:

List<String> tory = new List<String>();
List<String> tory2;

tory2 = new List<String>(tory);
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Here's a little bit more information on a reference vs a deep copy dreamincode.net/forums/topic/75435-deep-copy-object –  NickAtuShip Feb 23 '12 at 20:56
    
Tory and Tory1 were created as New List(0f BonoType) BonoType is just a class with only one string "name" and I assume Troy and Troy1 are objects created from this class. What I can't figure is why if I change one object the other changes and how can I stop this. If I try New tory it rejects this. –  user1229283 Mar 9 '12 at 2:20

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