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I have been given a request to dynamically host multiple WCF services in a single Windows service.

The requirements are the following:

  • The services are singletone instances implementing some service contract interfaces.
  • The services aren't known at compile-time - at runtime a collecion of unknown singletone services are passed to the application.
  • All services are exposed via the same mex endpoint
  • The endpoints are set programmatically (without using app.config)

I tried solving the problem from two different approaches:

  • The first approach is to create and open a ServiceHost for each service instance. The problem with this approach is that each ServiceHost is exposed via its own mex endpoint.
  • The second approach is to create a single ServiceHost for all services, and expose them all via the same mex endpoint.

I tried a couple of ways to implement the second approach:

  • The first way is to create a service type in runtime (using CodeDom or Reflection.Emit) that wraps all instances, and implements all of the service contracts and routes a given method call to the suitable service instance. This works but seems like a overkill. (I rather to not generate code if possible)
  • The second way is to programmatically setup ServiceEndpoints for requested contracts. I modified this following code example so it will route a method call to the corresponding service instance's method. The problem with this solution is that a hack is made in order to associate a ServiceEndpoint to its ChannelDispatcher.

Am I missing other approaches? Is there anyway to overcome the problems I mentioned?

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1 Answer 1

If I'm understanding your problem correctly, then one approach would be to implement multiple contract interfaces in a single service class. By doing that, you should be able to get the metadata from a single mex endpoint. Here's a very simple example:

[ServiceContract]
public interface IServiceContract1
{
    [OperationContract]
    bool DoStuff1();
}
[ServiceContract]
public interface IServiceContract2
{
    [OperationContract]
    bool DoStuff2();
}

public class ServiceContractImplementation: IServiceContract1, IServiceContract2
{
    bool DoStuff1()
    {
        return true;
    }
    bool DoStuff2()
    {
        return true;
    }
}

Then in the web.config (or in code in your case):

<service name="ServiceImplementation">
        <endpoint binding="basicHttpBinding" contract="IServiceContract1"/>
        <endpoint binding="basicHttpBinding" contract="IServiceContract2"/>
        <endpoint address="mex" contract="IMetadataExchange" />
      </service>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, I wasn't clear - the services hosted in the application are unknown at compile time - they are passed to the application in runtime (as singletone services instances). That's why I discussed code generation and etc. –  Kobi Feb 24 '12 at 19:52

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