Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following class Linea

class Linea
   include Comparable
   attr_accessor :maxcap, :capatuale, :citta1, :citta2, :lineac

   def initialize(c1, c2, maxc)
      raise CapacitaIllegale if maxc <= 0
      @maxcap = maxc
      @capatuale = maxc
      @citta1 = c1
      @citta2 = c2
      @lineac = []
      @lineac.push(c1)
      @lineac << c2
   end

    def <=> (l)
      if(l.is_a?(Linea))
        if (l.maxcap>@maxcap)
          return l.maxcap
        end
        if(l.maxcap==@maxcap)
          if (l.citta1.pop + l.citta2.pop>@citta1.pop+@citta2.pop)
            return l.maxcap
          end
        end
      end
      return -1
    end
  end

after in the class Rete where I want to insert the Linea and do the sort using <=> so;

  class Rete
     attr_accessor :lineec, :guasto_seg

     def initialize()
      @rete = []
      @guasto_seg = []
     end

     def aggiungi_linea(c1, c2, maxc)
        l = Linea.new(c1, c2, maxc)
        unless (citta_presente(c1, c2))
           @rete << l
           @rete.sort { |l1,l2| l1<=>l2 if l1.is_a?(Linea) and l2.is_a?(Linea) }
        else
           raise LineaGiaEsistente
        end
     end

     + some diferent method   

  end

I wanted to ask for explanations of how it is used for sort if mine is right is if <=> is done and called into the sort so right.??????? please give me an answer as soon as possible, thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
You may want to read the documentation on this: ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Array.html#method-i-sort –  summea Feb 23 '12 at 21:20

1 Answer 1

To be useful for sorting, the <=> method must behave like this:

big_linea <=> small_linea #=> 1
big_linea <=> equally_big_linea #=> 0
small_linea <=> big_linea #=> -1

When that works, you should be able to do

@rete.sort #no block needed
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.