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I've been having a bit of trouble lately in C++ with virtual methods/inheritance

At first if i try to extend a super class i get this error:

'Undefined reference to GameState::GameState()'

but if i remove the constructors all together i don't get the above error but i end up with a segmentation fault which occurs when calling the virtual method.

This is my code:

#ifndef GAMESTATE_H
#define GAMESTATE_H

#include <stdlib.h>

#include "Resources.h"
#include "Renderer.h"

class GameState {
public:
    GameState();
    virtual void init(Resources *res) = 0;
    virtual void exit() = 0;
    virtual void update() = 0;
    virtual void render(Renderer *renderer) = 0;
};

#endif // GAMESTATE_H

and this is the subclass:

#include "GameState.h"

class MainGameState : public GameState {
public:
    MainGameState() : GameState() {

    }

    virtual void init(Resources *res) {

    }

    virtual void update() {
        printf("test\n");
    }

    virtual void render(Renderer *renderer) {

    }

    virtual void exit() {

    }
private:
    SDL_Surface *image;
};
share|improve this question
    
And where did you define GameState::GameState? – Fred Foo Feb 23 '12 at 22:04
    
How are you using these classes – rerun Feb 23 '12 at 22:05
    
Maybe post an example call. Also you could try asking valgrind what gives the segmentation fault – Tim Feb 23 '12 at 22:05
    
Your first error is because the abstract class GameState does not give a definition to its constructor, but the MainGameState constructor calls it. Just changing GameState(); to GameState() { } would fix that. We could be more help with the second if you told us which virtual method you're calling before the segfault. – Steve Howard Feb 23 '12 at 22:07

Try

GameState() { }

instead of

GameState();

or define it somewhere else.

Though, I'm not sure if it has anything to do with virtual methods. I think there's a bug elsewhere. Perhaps, uninitialized pointer?

share|improve this answer

You need to provide an implementation for the constructor if you want to explicitly call it:

class GameState {
public:
    GameState() {} // implementation
    virtual void init(Resources *res) = 0;
    virtual void exit() = 0;
    virtual void update() = 0;
    virtual void render(Renderer *renderer) = 0;
};
share|improve this answer
    
I think you shouldn't put a semicolon there. – Michael Krelin - hacker Feb 23 '12 at 22:07
    
@MichaelKrelin-hacker right. – Luchian Grigore Feb 23 '12 at 22:09

Here is a complete program which implements the base and derived classes you are looking for. You receive the linker error message because you never implemented GameState::GameState. It isn't clear why you got the segmentation fault.

Remember also, if you want to delete your objects polymorphically, declare and define a virtual base-class destructor.

#include <iostream>
#define X() (std::cout << __FUNCTION__ << "\n")
class GameState {
public:
  GameState() { X(); }
  virtual ~GameState() { X(); }
  virtual void F() = 0;
};

class MainGameState : public GameState {
public:
  MainGameState() : GameState() { X(); }
  void F() { X(); }
  ~MainGameState() { X(); }
};

int main () {
  GameState* pGS = new MainGameState;
  X();
  pGS->F();
  delete pGS;
}
share|improve this answer

This error 'Undefined reference to GameState::GameState()' tells you that GameState constructor isn't defined. It has nothing to do with virtual method.

Do what @Luchian and @Micheal said:

class GameState {
public:
    GameState() {} // implementation

If it was a virtual method error, you would get something like "the 'MainGameState' must implement inherited pure virtual method 'method name'"

EDIT: Note that the super class constructor is implicitly called when you instantiate a sub-class.

share|improve this answer
  1. The compiler will call a parameterless base class constructor (default constructor) for you anyway, so it is unnecessary. However, are you even providing a definition for GameState::GameState()? Probably not, so you should just get rid of it or provide an implementation (i.e., GameState() { }).

  2. We need to see how you are calling the function. That looks fine to me, your bug is somewhere else. Are you perhaps declaring a pointer to an object, not initializing it, and then calling update()?

If I have to guess (and apparently I do...) I would bet that you have something like this:

MainGameState *state;
state->update();  // oops!  Not initialize!

Of course I may be wrong, but like I said, I am forced to guess until you update your question with the real code.

share|improve this answer
    
@LuchianGrigore: Haha yeah I know, that was a mental blip. I go between C# and C++ so often that I sometimes confuse the syntax between the two. I edited that out before you posted the comment. Thanks. – Ed S. Feb 23 '12 at 22:10
    
Also, the term is 'default constructor'. You probably know that already and I'm guessing you used parameterless so it's easier for the op to understand. – Luchian Grigore Feb 23 '12 at 22:13
    
@LuchianGrigore: Yes, I know, and a default constructor is parameterless. – Ed S. Feb 23 '12 at 22:13
    
:) I figured that. I just pressed enter key before I was done writing the whole comment :) – Luchian Grigore Feb 23 '12 at 22:14
    
@LuchianGrigore: Yeah, you're right though; it doesn't hurt to use common language when talking to a relative beginner as to save them some confusion in the future. I just wish I could see how he is calling the function that is faulting... – Ed S. Feb 23 '12 at 22:18

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