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I'd like to create a data.frame of all possible permutations of 10 variables that can be either 1 or 2

2*2*2*2*2*2*2*2*2*2 = 1024 # possible

1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1
1,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1
1,2,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1
1,2,2,2,1,1,1,1,1,1
...

Is there a "quick" way to do this in R?

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2  
There's a permutations function in gregmisc I believe. You can coerce the resulting matrix to a data.frame. –  Ari B. Friedman Feb 23 '12 at 23:23
1  
Alternatively combn in base, combined with unique(x, MARGIN=2). –  jbaums Feb 23 '12 at 23:33
    
Raffael, order matters - hence it's a permutation. If it wasn't important I'd only need 11 combinations which I could write out myself. Reverting edit. –  Brandon Bertelsen Aug 21 '13 at 11:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

how about this:

tmp = expand.grid(1:2,1:2,1:2,1:2,1:2,1:2,1:2,1:2,1:2,1:2)

or this (thanks Tyler):

x <- list(1:2)
tmp = expand.grid(rep(x, 10))
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1  
nrow(unique(tmp)) = 1024. Thanks for that. –  Brandon Bertelsen Feb 23 '12 at 23:23
13  
To type less code you could use: x <- list(1:2); tmp = expand.grid(rep(x, 10)) –  Tyler Rinker Feb 23 '12 at 23:30
    
Good to know; thanks. –  baha-kev Feb 23 '12 at 23:32
    
I guess I'm asking too much, but it crashes when you try a large number like: expand.grid(0:451, 0:451, 0:451, 0:451). Is there any other way to do that? –  vitor Jul 31 '13 at 22:05
2  
@aguiar what is 452^4? -- that will be the number of combinations. That is almost 10 times the limit the length of a vector on 32-bit R, so you would need 64 bit R and perhaps 1 terrabyte of Ram! –  mnel Aug 19 '13 at 23:25

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