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In CVS I could do the following

cvs -n update

And it would should me what would happen if I ran an update but without changing anything. I mainly use this to check if I am going to get a lot of conflicts.

In svn I would like to do the same but with the switch command

ie:

svn -n switch url1 url2

My understanding is that there is a --dry-run switch which goes through the motions but doesn't actually give any output. So it is half of the way there :)

How can I get it to do a dry run and show what the results would be (which files will be Modified, which Updated, Deleted, Added and Conflicting).

Thanks

Update: Regarding those who have suggested I use --dry-run I have tried the following

svn switch url --dry-run

and I get

Subcommand 'switch' doesn't accept option '--dry-run'

In theory it sounds good but it doesn't seem to work, am I doing something wrong?

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I don't understand why you think svn switch would be equivalent to cvs update? It's not. –  lothar Jun 2 '09 at 23:23
    
I know the switch in svn is different from update cvs . That pretty obvious. The question. In CVS, we can use the -n option with any cvs command. What is the equivalent for svn, I would like to use it with switch? –  hhafez Jun 2 '09 at 23:28
    
Why would you want to dry-run with a switch? Check Don's answer, I think merge might be what your are looking for. –  simao Jun 2 '09 at 23:31
    
I don't understand your question.... I want to do a switch and I want to know what the impact will be in terms of Conflicts, Additions, Updates etc... What is so strange about that? –  hhafez Jun 2 '09 at 23:32
    
@hhafez Well the answer is --dry-run IS the option for svn. That it does not work with switch is tough luck, but Don already gave you a workaround, so be happy ;-) –  lothar Jun 2 '09 at 23:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use merge and --dry-run with the same URLs you will use for the switch. It should give you the information you are looking for even though you'll be using switch instead of merge in the end.

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3  
It is a shame that --dry-run doesn't work with commit. –  Mike Miller Apr 3 '12 at 15:01
2  
@MikeMiller If you want to check what file will be committed, don't write a message with the command. This way an editor will open for you to introduce the message and the list of files that are about to be committed will show up –  Gonçalo Queirós Sep 5 '13 at 10:52

Use --dry-run

--dry-run
Goes through all the motions of running a command, but makes no actual changes—either on disk or in the repository.

From: Subversion Complete Reference

Well your question was (and still is so far)

How to make SVN perform a command without making changes

The answer is: Use --dry-run

The fact the --dry-run does not work with the switch command is tough luck, but @Don gave you a nice workaround

Use merge and --dry-run with the same URLs you will use for the switch. It should give you the information you are looking for even though you'll be using switch instead of merge in the end.

Of course you can also file a bug/enhancement report with subversion.

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see my update regarding --dry-run –  hhafez Jun 2 '09 at 23:00
    
@hhafez Please read the reference guide. --dry-run may not apply to all svn commands, but most (switch is obviously an exception) –  lothar Jun 2 '09 at 23:24

On svn update, you can use svn status --show-updates to show all items you will update.

For merges, you can use --dry-run any problems.

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As far as I was aware, dry-run will show you what it will do, including what will be conflicted, etc.

http://svnbook.red-bean.com/en/1.4/svn.branchmerge.copychanges.html (search for "dry-run" on that page)

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see my update regarding --dry-run –  hhafez Jun 2 '09 at 23:00

The --verbose option might be what you're looking for

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It's not. At all. –  tubaguy50035 Mar 31 at 15:12

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