Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How are triggers implemented inside a SQL database engine? I am not referring to the SQL language-level trigger definitions but rather their underlying implementations inside Oracle, SQL Server, MySQL, etc. How can the database engine scalably manage hundreds or thousands of triggers? Do they use a publish-subscribe model like with an observer/listener pattern? Any pointers to relevant literature on the subject would also be appreciated.

I did google for "database trigger implementation" but all I found was information on SQL trigger definitions, which again is not want I'm looking for.

share|improve this question
    
I think this should probably be on Database Administrators..; but I'll be keeping an eye on it as I don't actually know. –  Ben Feb 23 '12 at 23:42

3 Answers 3

Triggers are callbacks, so the implementation can be as simple as function pointers in C. Normally, a user is not expected writing user-defined procedural code in the RDBMS in C, though. You would need to support some other "higher-level" language. So the relevant programming pattern is DSL. The number of triggers (scalability) itself is not a problem because there is usually only one, max two per table and DML event triggers only these. The implementation challenge is elsewhere: in the areas of consistency, concurrency semantics.

share|improve this answer
    
I am trying to implement a trigger-like mechanism in my own system. Yes, I am aware that the "user is not expected writing [sic] user-defined procedural code in the RDBMS". I am not limiting myself to your assumption that "there is usually only one, max two per table". I am looking at a high-end case where there may be thousands of triggers. –  stackoverflowuser2010 Feb 24 '12 at 19:39
    
There is extremely limited number of trigger events: insert, update, delete -- I fail to think of anything else. In some odd ball scenario a trigger can call thousand of procedures -- but here I'm completely off to the fantasy land not understanding your requirements. –  Tegiri Nenashi Feb 27 '12 at 17:10

You can explore source codes of open source databases. For example PostreSql's trigger.

share|improve this answer

First off, triggers are pieces of code that are run when a particular event (e.g. INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE on a particular table) occurs in the database. Triggers are executed implicitly BEFORE or AFER the DML statement and triggers cannot be executed explicitly like stored procedures.

There are also two types of triggers - STATEMENT LEVEL triggers and ROW LEVEL triggers.

The STATEMENT LEVEL triggers are fired BEFORE or AFTER a statement is executed.

The ROW LEVEL triggers are fired BEFORE or AFTER an operation is performed on each individual row affected by the operation.

So we have 12 types of triggers:

 1. BEFORE INSERT STATEMENT
 2. BEFORE INSERT ROW
 3. AFTER INSERT STATEMENT
 4. AFTER INSERT ROW
 5. BEFORE UPDATE STATEMENT
 6. BEFORE UPDATE ROW
 7. AFTER UPDATE STATEMENT
 8. AFTER UPDATE ROW
 9. BEFORE DELETE STATEMENT
 10. BEFORE DELETE ROW
 11. AFTER DELETE STATEMENT
 12. AFTER DELETE ROW

Multiple triggers can be coded for an event with their order of precedence of execution mentioned.

Whenever we run a DML query (INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE) on a database, that query is run in a transaction. Hence when a query runs -

  1. The table is locked
  2. The DBMS checks for triggers that run BEFORE the statement is to be executed
  3. Execute the actual SQL statement row-by-row.
  4. The BEFORE trigger for EACH ROW is looked for. If found, executed.
  5. Check for errors. If any, rollback the changes made by the statement or its triggers.
  6. Any AFTER EACH ROW triggers are found and executed.
  7. Any AFTER STATEMENT triggers are found and executed.

Different DBMS manage transactions differently. Refer to their documentation for details.

Many DBMS keep the triggers in text format only, not like stored procedures that are compiled.

It is best practice to call stored procedures from inside a trigger body as stored procedures are much faster performers than triggers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.