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This is a homework assignment and I'm having trouble with my output. Everything works as expected except the Integer.toString() isn't giving me the result I want. It is still outputting just a bunch of numbers when I want them to be converted to the actual word. Here's the code and output:

    import java.io.*;

    public class NumStream extends OutputStream
    {
        public void write(int c) throws IOException
        {  
            StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
            switch(c)
            {
                case ' ': sb.append(" ");
                    break;
                case '1': sb.append("One");
                    break;
                case '2': sb.append("Two");
                    break;
                case '3': sb.append("Three");
                    break;
                case '4': sb.append("Four");
                    break;                
                case '5': sb.append("Five");
                    break; 
                case '6': sb.append("Six");
                    break;
                case '7': sb.append("Seven");
                    break;
                case '8': sb.append("Eight");
                    break;     
                case '9': sb.append("Nine");
                    break; 
                case '0': sb.append("Zero");
                    break;
                default:  sb.append(Integer.toString(c));
                    break;
            }
            System.out.print(sb);
        }
        public static void main(String[] args) 
        {
            NumStream ns = new NumStream();
            PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(ns));
            pw.println("123456789 and ! and # ");
            pw.flush();
        }
    }

the output is: OneTwoThreeFourFiveSixSevenEightNine 97110100 33 97110100 35 1310

can somebody please tell me how to format code easier in this forum? I had to manually 8 space indent each line and there's got to be an easier way!

share|improve this question
    
Use the tab key... Also, most programming text editors will auto-indent the new line to where the last one started. – Sam Dufel Feb 24 '12 at 0:55
    
easiest way is to use an editor to format your code with spaces for indentation (no tabs) and an extra 4 spaces of indent on every line. Then just cut-paste from the editor to SO input box. – Chris Dodd Feb 24 '12 at 0:59
up vote 1 down vote accepted

For characters that aren't digits, you're taking the character code and converting it to a number. So 97 110 and 100 are the character codes for 'a', 'n', and 'd' while 33 and 35 are ! and #.

What you probably want for your default case is just:

default: sb.append((char)c); break;

Note that creating a new StringBuffer each time the write routine is called is extremely wasteful and inefficient. Since you're only ever appending one string/char to it, you might as well just print that string/char directly rather than copying through a StringBuffer.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm, I tried that but it is still showing the same output. I'm guessing it's automatically being converted to ascii when I pass the value in. Is there something that converts ascii back to a character? – Kon-Kon Chao Feb 24 '12 at 0:59
    
Oh nice! That works perfectly. Thanks so much! – Kon-Kon Chao Feb 24 '12 at 1:03
    
Ah okay, that's also good to know too, thanks for the tips. – Kon-Kon Chao Feb 24 '12 at 1:05

You are outputing the ascii code of characters which are not digits in sb.append(Integer.toString(c)).

share|improve this answer

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