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I am very new to perl and have a question. I am trying to create files in a directory and write to those files. Here is what I have so far, it creates the directories but doesn't write anything in them. I can't figure out how to write to the files, I've looked at creating a tee or multidimensional array but that didn't work.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @alpha = ("aa".."bb");


for my $combo(@alpha)
{
open(DFILE,"+>$combo") || die "die open failed";

while (<DFILE>)
{
   print $_;
}
close(DFILE);
}
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3  
why are you reading with (<DFILE>) and writing the same line? what is your goal? –  perreal Feb 24 '12 at 1:04

3 Answers 3

The following creates 28 files and writes the upper case of filename to the file. For example, it creates a file named aa containing one line: AA.

use warnings;
use strict;
use File::Slurp;

for ('aa' .. 'bb') {
    write_file($_, uc $_);
}

See File::Slurp.

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In short, to write something to a file opened with DFILE handle, you should use

 print DFILE 'something to print';

But I'm confused about your goals a bit, especially about what exactly you're going to write to these files. Could you clarify it?

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You're opening files for writing (the >), and enhancing that for reading (the +). After you open the file, you read from its filehandle and printing what you read to the default filehandle (STDOUT). When you're done, you close the file.

If the file doesn't already exist, you'll create the file, there won't be anything to read (and nothing to print), and you'll close the still empty files.

I don't know what you are trying to do. If you are trying to add lines to a file, you can open it for append instead (>>). When you want to print to that filehandle, you have to tell the print which filehandle you'd like to use:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @alpha = ("aa".."ab");

for my $combo ( @alpha ) {
    open my $fh, ">>", $combo or die "die open failed: $!";

    printf $fh "[%s] Here's a new line in $combo\n", scalar localtime;
    }

This produces files with output like:

[Fri Feb 24 09:07:17 2012] Here's a new line in aa
[Fri Feb 24 09:08:52 2012] Here's a new line in aa

If you are trying to print to the file and to standard output at the same time (since you mention a tee), you can create a filehandle that multiplexes to one or more other file handles. The IO::Tee can do that for you:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

use IO::Tee; # get from CPAN

my @alpha = ("aa".."ab");

for my $combo ( @alpha ) {
    open my $fh, ">>", $combo or die "die open failed: $!";
    my $tee = IO::Tee->new( $fh, \*STDOUT );
    printf $tee "[%s] Here's a new line in $combo\n", scalar localtime;
    }

Now each output lines goes to two places: the screen and the file.

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