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I wrote my own trivial little function (php for convenience) and was hoping someone could help structure a proof by induction for it, just so I can get a very basic hang of it.

function add_numbers($max) {
  //assume max >= 2
  $index=1;
  $array=array(0);
  while ($index != $max) {
     //invariant: ∀ k:1 .. index-1, array[k]=array[k-1]+1
     $array[$index] = $array[$index-1]+1;
     $index += 1;
  }
}

The result being that the value at each index is the same as the index itself, though only because a[0] was initialized to 0.

I believe the goal is (or should be) to prove that the invariant (which may itself be suspect, but hopefully gets the point across) holds for k+1.

Thanks

edit: examples: http://homepages.ius.edu/rwisman/C455/html/notes/Chapter2/LoopInvariantProof.htm

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I don't know what proof by induction means. If you can explain, maybe I can help... –  J. Bruni Feb 24 '12 at 1:54
    
@J.Bruni, see this Wikipedia page about proof by induction. –  Arjan Feb 26 '12 at 23:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Something like this, maybe, although this is a little pedantic.

Invariant: when index = n, for n >= 1 (at the top of the loop where it checks the condition), array[i] = i for 0 <= i < n.

Proof: The proof is by induction. In the base case n = 1, the loop is checking the condition for the first time, the body has not executed, and we have an outside guarantee that array[0] = 0, from earlier in the code. Assume the invariant holds for all n up to k. For k + 1, we assign array[k] = array[k-1] + 1. From the induction hypothesis, array[k-1] = k-1, so the value assigned array[k] is (k-1)+1 = k. Thus the invariant holds for the next, and by induction every, value of n (at the top of the loop).

EDIT:

function add_numbers($max) {
  //assume max >= 2
  $index=1;
  $array=array(63);
  while ($index != $max) {
     //invariant: ∀ k:1 .. index-1, array[k]=array[k-1]+1
     $array[$index] = $array[$index-1]+1;
     $index += 1;
  }
}

Invariant: when index = n, for n >= 1 (at the top of the loop where it checks the condition), array[i] = i + 63 for 0 <= i < n.

Proof: The proof is by induction. In the base case n = 1, the loop is checking the condition for the first time, the body has not executed, and we have an outside guarantee that array[0] = 63, from earlier in the code. Assume the invariant holds for all n up to k. For k + 1, we assign array[k] = array[k-1] + 1. From the induction hypothesis, array[k-1] = (k-1) + 63 = k + 62, so the value assigned array[k] is (k+62)+1 = k+63. Thus the invariant holds for the next, and by induction every, value of n (at the top of the loop).

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I could be wrong but since the invariant initially ranges from 1 to 0, the base case may be vacuously true. –  Elrond Elve Feb 27 '12 at 3:09
    
Might take unfair advantage of the convenience that array[0]=0 - and I think the line "array[k-1] is (k-1+1) = k" may be mistaken because we know array[k-1]!=k. I'd also have expected to see k+1 appear somewhere in the math of the induction step? –  Elrond Elve Feb 27 '12 at 4:31
    
@ElrondElve In a sense, the base case is vacuously true, because you assure that it will be true before the execution of the loop body. It is in no way unfair to use the program state before the execution of the loop body, provided you can convince me that it is what you say it is. Also, yes; it appears there's an array[k-1] where there ought to be an array[k]; will get around to fixing it at the office. Note that, in induction, the base case proof is often of a different nature than that of the induction... don't let that concern you. Program context/state is a valid approach here. –  Patrick87 Feb 27 '12 at 13:03
    
Perhaps what I should say is that it must also be possible to treat it even more generally, because array[0] could just as easily have had a value of 63. –  Elrond Elve Feb 27 '12 at 15:29
    
@ElrondElve See my edit for that hypothetical case. –  Patrick87 Feb 27 '12 at 16:16

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