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I used the following code based on this

ballA.vx = (u1x * (m1 - m2) + 2 * m2 * u2x) / (m1 + m2);
ballA.vy = (u1y * (m1 - m2) + 2 * m2 * u2y) / (m1 + m2);

ballB.vx = (u2x * (m2 - m1) + 2 * m1 * u1x) / (m1 + m2);
ballB.vy = (u2y * (m2 - m1) + 2 * m1 * u1y) / (m1 + m2);

but it obviously doesn't well as the formula is designed for one-dimensional collisions.

So I tried to use the below formula from this section.

But the problem is that I don't know what the angle of deflection is and how to calculate it. Also, how to take into account the bouncing coefficient in this formula?

Edit: I may have not been clear. The above code does work, although it may not be the expected behavior, as the original formula is designed for 1D collisions. The issues I'm trying therefore are:

  • What is the 2D equivalent?
  • How to take the bouncing coefficient into account?
  • How to calculate the direction (which is expressed with vx and vy) of the two balls following the collision?
share|improve this question
    
you seem to be using elastic collision formulas when and if you are going to worry about "bouncing coefficients" you want to look at inelastic collisions en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inelastic_collision as the equations your using don't have that concept as they "perfectly maintain all the system's energy" –  ckozl Feb 24 '12 at 2:28
    
Turns out you're right. But now how to apply the given formula to a 2D collision? –  seriousdev Feb 24 '12 at 14:14
    
in response to edit: There is no such thing as a "2D equivalent" collisions are linear in nature –  ckozl Feb 24 '12 at 19:32
    
But then why are the formulas for 1D and 2D different? –  seriousdev Feb 24 '12 at 19:56
    
it's not they're just breaking a single equation into it's respective components using trig, see my new answer below... –  ckozl Feb 26 '12 at 18:30

3 Answers 3

I should start by saying: I created a new answer because I feel the old one has value for its simplicity

as promised here is a much more complex physics engine, yet I still feel it's simple enough to follow (hopefully! or I just wasted my time... lol), (url: http://jsbin.com/otipiv/edit#javascript,live)

function Vector(x, y) {
  this.x = x;
  this.y = y;
}

Vector.prototype.dot = function (v) {
  return this.x * v.x + this.y * v.y;
};

Vector.prototype.length = function() {
  return Math.sqrt(this.x * this.x + this.y * this.y);
};

Vector.prototype.normalize = function() {
  var s = 1 / this.length();
  this.x *= s;
  this.y *= s;
  return this;
};

Vector.prototype.multiply = function(s) {
  return new Vector(this.x * s, this.y * s);
};

Vector.prototype.tx = function(v) {
  this.x += v.x;
  this.y += v.y;
  return this;
};

function BallObject(elasticity, vx, vy) {
  this.v = new Vector(vx || 0, vy || 0); // velocity: m/s^2
  this.m = 10; // mass: kg
  this.r = 15; // radius of obj
  this.p = new Vector(0, 0); // position  
  this.cr = elasticity; // elasticity
}

BallObject.prototype.draw = function(ctx) {
  ctx.beginPath();
  ctx.arc(this.p.x, this.p.y, this.r, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
  ctx.closePath();
  ctx.fill();
  ctx.stroke();
};

BallObject.prototype.update = function(g, dt, ppm) {

  this.v.y += g * dt;
  this.p.x += this.v.x * dt * ppm;
  this.p.y += this.v.y * dt * ppm;

};

BallObject.prototype.collide = function(obj) {

  var dt, mT, v1, v2, cr, sm,
      dn = new Vector(this.p.x - obj.p.x, this.p.y - obj.p.y),
      sr = this.r + obj.r, // sum of radii
      dx = dn.length(); // pre-normalized magnitude

  if (dx > sr) {
    return; // no collision
  }

  // sum the masses, normalize the collision vector and get its tangential
  sm = this.m + obj.m;
  dn.normalize();
  dt = new Vector(dn.y, -dn.x);

  // avoid double collisions by "un-deforming" balls (larger mass == less tx)
  // this is susceptible to rounding errors, "jiggle" behavior and anti-gravity
  // suspension of the object get into a strange state
  mT = dn.multiply(this.r + obj.r - dx);
  this.p.tx(mT.multiply(obj.m / sm));
  obj.p.tx(mT.multiply(-this.m / sm));

  // this interaction is strange, as the CR describes more than just
  // the ball's bounce properties, it describes the level of conservation
  // observed in a collision and to be "true" needs to describe, rigidity, 
  // elasticity, level of energy lost to deformation or adhesion, and crazy
  // values (such as cr > 1 or cr < 0) for stange edge cases obviously not
  // handled here (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coefficient_of_restitution)
  // for now assume the ball with the least amount of elasticity describes the
  // collision as a whole:
  cr = Math.min(this.cr, obj.cr);

  // cache the magnitude of the applicable component of the relevant velocity
  v1 = dn.multiply(this.v.dot(dn)).length();
  v2 = dn.multiply(obj.v.dot(dn)).length(); 

  // maintain the unapplicatble component of the relevant velocity
  // then apply the formula for inelastic collisions
  this.v = dt.multiply(this.v.dot(dt));
  this.v.tx(dn.multiply((cr * obj.m * (v2 - v1) + this.m * v1 + obj.m * v2) / sm));

  // do this once for each object, since we are assuming collide will be called 
  // only once per "frame" and its also more effiecient for calculation cacheing 
  // purposes
  obj.v = dt.multiply(obj.v.dot(dt));
  obj.v.tx(dn.multiply((cr * this.m * (v1 - v2) + obj.m * v2 + this.m * v1) / sm));
};

function FloorObject(floor) {
  var py;

  this.v = new Vector(0, 0);
  this.m = 5.9722 * Math.pow(10, 24);
  this.r = 10000000;
  this.p = new Vector(0, py = this.r + floor);
  this.update = function() {
      this.v.x = 0;
      this.v.y = 0;
      this.p.x = 0;
      this.p.y = py;
  };
  // custom to minimize unnecessary filling:
  this.draw = function(ctx) {
    var c = ctx.canvas, s = ctx.scale;
    ctx.fillRect(c.width / -2 / s, floor, ctx.canvas.width / s, (ctx.canvas.height / s) - floor);
  };
}

FloorObject.prototype = new BallObject(1);

function createCanvasWithControls(objs) {
  var addBall = function() { objs.unshift(new BallObject(els.value / 100, (Math.random() * 10) - 5, -20)); },
      d = document,
      c = d.createElement('canvas'),
      b = d.createElement('button'),
      els = d.createElement('input'),
      clr = d.createElement('input'),
      cnt = d.createElement('input'),
      clrl = d.createElement('label'),
      cntl = d.createElement('label');

  b.innerHTML = 'add ball with elasticity: <span>0.70</span>';
  b.onclick = addBall;

  els.type = 'range';
  els.min = 0;
  els.max = 100;
  els.step = 1;
  els.value = 70;
  els.style.display = 'block';
  els.onchange = function() { 
    b.getElementsByTagName('span')[0].innerHTML = (this.value / 100).toFixed(2);
  };

  clr.type = cnt.type = 'checkbox';
  clr.checked = cnt.checked = true;
  clrl.style.display = cntl.style.display = 'block';

  clrl.appendChild(clr);
  clrl.appendChild(d.createTextNode('clear each frame'));

  cntl.appendChild(cnt);
  cntl.appendChild(d.createTextNode('continuous shower!'));

  c.style.border = 'solid 1px #3369ff';
  c.style.display = 'block';
  c.width = 700;
  c.height = 550;
  c.shouldClear = function() { return clr.checked; };

  d.body.appendChild(c);
  d.body.appendChild(els);
  d.body.appendChild(b);
  d.body.appendChild(clrl);
  d.body.appendChild(cntl);

  setInterval(function() {
    if (cnt.checked) {
       addBall();
    }
  }, 333);

  return c;
}

// start:
var objs = [],
    c = createCanvasWithControls(objs),
    ctx = c.getContext('2d'),
    fps = 30, // target frames per second
    ppm = 20, // pixels per meter
    g = 9.8, // m/s^2 - acceleration due to gravity
    t = new Date().getTime();

// add the floor:
objs.push(new FloorObject(c.height - 10));

// as expando so its accessible in draw [this overides .scale(x,y)]
ctx.scale = 0.5; 
ctx.fillStyle = 'rgb(100,200,255)';
ctx.strokeStyle = 'rgb(33,69,233)';
ctx.transform(ctx.scale, 0, 0, ctx.scale, c.width / 2, c.height / 2);

setInterval(function() {

  var i, j,
      nw = c.width / ctx.scale,
      nh = c.height / ctx.scale,
      nt = new Date().getTime(),
      dt = (nt - t) / 1000;

  if (c.shouldClear()) {
    ctx.clearRect(nw / -2, nh / -2, nw, nh);
  }

  for (i = 0; i < objs.length; i++) {

    // if a ball > viewport width away from center remove it
    while (objs[i].p.x < -nw || objs[i].p.x > nw) { 
      objs.splice(i, 1);
    }

    objs[i].update(g, dt, ppm, objs, i);

    for (j = i + 1; j < objs.length; j++) {
      objs[j].collide(objs[i]);
    }

    objs[i].draw(ctx);
  }

  t = nt;

}, 1000 / fps);

the real "meat" and the origin for this discussion is the obj.collide(obj) method.

if we dive in (I commented it this time as it is much more complex than the "last"), you'll see that this equation: equation for inelastic collision, is still the only one being used in this line: this.v.tx(dn.multiply((cr * obj.m * (v2 - v1) + this.m * v1 + obj.m * v2) / sm)); now I'm sure you're still saying: "zomg wtf! that's the same single dimension equation!" but when you stop and think about it a "collision" only ever happens in a single dimension. Which is why we use vector equations to extract the applicable components and apply the collisions only to those specific parts leaving the others untouched to go on their merry way (ignoring friction and simplifying the collision to not account for dynamic energy transforming forces as described in the comments for CR). This concept obviously gets more complicated as the object complexity grows and number of scene data points increases to account for things like deformity, rotational inertia, uneven mass distribution and points of friction... but that's so far beyond the scope of this it's almost not worth mentioning..

Basically, the concepts you really need to "grasp" for this to feel intuitive to you are the basics of Vector equations (all located in the Vector prototype), how they interact with each (what it actually means to normalize, or take a dot/scalar product, eg. reading/talking to someone knowledgeable) and a basic understanding of how collisions act on properties of an object (mass, speed, etc... again, read/talk to someone knowledgeable)

I hope this helps, good luck! -ck

share|improve this answer

here is a demo of an inelastic collision equation in action, custom made for you:

function BallObject(elasticity) {
  this.v = { x: 1, y: 20 }; // velocity: m/s^2
  this.m = 10; // mass: kg
  this.p = { x: 40, y: 0}; // position
  this.r = 15; // radius of obj
  this.cr = elasticity; // elasticity
}

function draw(obj) {
  ctx.beginPath();
  ctx.arc(obj.p.x, obj.p.y, obj.r, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
  ctx.closePath();
  ctx.stroke();
  ctx.fill();
}

function collide(obj) {
  obj.v.y = (obj.cr * floor.m * -obj.v.y + obj.m * obj.v.y) / (obj.m + floor.m);
}

function update(obj, dt) {

  // over-simplified collision detection
  // only consider the floor for simplicity
  if ((obj.p.y + obj.r) > c.height) { 
     obj.p.y = c.height - obj.r;
     collide(obj);
  }

  obj.v.y += g * dt;
  obj.p.x += obj.v.x * dt * ppm;
  obj.p.y += obj.v.y * dt * ppm;
}

var d = document,
    c = d.createElement('canvas'),
    b = d.createElement('button'),
    els = d.createElement('input'),
    clr = d.createElement('input'),
    clrl = d.createElement('label'),
    ctx = c.getContext('2d'),
    fps = 30, // target frames per second
    ppm = 20, // pixels per meter
    g = 9.8, // m/s^2 - acceleration due to gravity
    objs = [],
    floor = {
      v: { x: 0, y: 0 }, // floor is immobile
      m: 5.9722 * Math.pow(10, 24) // mass of earth (probably could be smaller)
    },
    t = new Date().getTime();

b.innerHTML = 'add ball with elasticity: <span>0.70</span>';
b.onclick = function() { objs.push(new BallObject(els.value / 100)); };

els.type = 'range';
els.min = 0;
els.max = 100;
els.step = 1;
els.value = 70;
els.style.display = 'block';
els.onchange = function() { 
  b.getElementsByTagName('span')[0].innerHTML = (this.value / 100).toFixed(2); 
};

clr.type = 'checkbox';
clr.checked = true;

clrl.appendChild(clr);
clrl.appendChild(d.createTextNode('clear each frame'));

c.style.border = 'solid 1px #3369ff';
c.style.borderRadius = '10px';
c.style.display = 'block';
c.width = 400;
c.height = 400;

ctx.fillStyle = 'rgb(100,200,255)';
ctx.strokeStyle = 'rgb(33,69,233)';

d.body.appendChild(c);
d.body.appendChild(els);
d.body.appendChild(b);
d.body.appendChild(clrl);

setInterval(function() {

  var nt = new Date().getTime(),
      dt = (nt - t) / 1000;

  if (clr.checked) {
    ctx.clearRect(0, 0, c.width, c.height);
  }

  for (var i = 0; i < objs.length; i++) {
    update(objs[i], dt);
    draw(objs[i]);
  }

  t = nt;

}, 1000 / fps);

to see it in action yourself, just go here: http://jsbin.com/iwuxol/edit#javascript,live

This utilizes this equation: enter image description here

and since your "floor" doesn't move you only have to consider the influence on the ball's y velocity. mind you there are quite a few shortcuts and oversights here so this is a very primitive physics engine, and is mainly meant to illustrate this one equation...

hope this helps -ck

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for all the work! But I think you missed the point: what about ball to ball collisions? –  seriousdev Feb 24 '12 at 18:11
    
@seriousdev, honestly I think you have a lot of reading ahead of you. but it breaks down like this, objects only ever interact with each other's velocities on a single transformed set of axis, the case I illustrated for you above is the simplest. one object should be [almost] unaffected by the collision and the other is being acted directly on the y axis. And please don't tell me I "missed the point," you just aren't asking the right questions. You have to think of angular velocities in terms of their vector components and you have to vectorize your velocities so [..cont..] –  ckozl Feb 24 '12 at 18:31
    
.. the collision is occurring against a single axis, meaning by rotating a pseudo coordinate system so that the the velocity affecting the outcome of the impact lies on a single axis. if I get time, perhaps I could give you a more complex yet still easy to follow demo... in the meantime, think of it like this: the formula isn't "designed for one-dimensional collisions" - it's just that the collision only occurs in one dimension, ignoring friction, the impact does not affect any other dimension regardless of the angle of incidence... –  ckozl Feb 24 '12 at 18:34
    
You're right saying I didn't ask the right questions, please see my edit. –  seriousdev Feb 24 '12 at 18:56
    
It occurs to me that the ball's mass (m) is never applied to the simulation. In the example it does not matter if you set m to 10 or 10000000. Can you clarify? –  ChristianSch Sep 21 '12 at 2:44

I strongly recommend you familiarize yourself with the center of momentum frame. It makes collisions much easier to understand. (And without that understanding you're just manipulating cryptic equations and you'll never know why things go wrong.)

Anyway, to determine the angle, you can use the impact parameter, basically how far "off center" one ball hits the other. The two balls are approaching each other in opposite directions (in the center-of-momentum frame), and the distance between their centers perpendicular to those velocities is the impact parameter h. Then the angle of deflection is 2 acos(h/(r1+r2)).

Once you get that working perfectly, you can worry about inelastic collisions and the coefficient of restitution.

share|improve this answer

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