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I am trying to solve this simple system. Please take a look and let me know:

x + y = 8
y + z = 3
x + z = ?
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closed as off topic by Michael Petrotta, Dennis, martin clayton, AakashM, woodchips Feb 24 '12 at 9:35

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2  
Are you trying to do this in code? If this is for a class, try out math.stackexchange.com –  Collin Feb 24 '12 at 4:03
    
The system is under-constrained, meaning there is more than one correct answer (infinite in fact). I'd ask the question over at math.stackexchange.com, the answers would be more appropriate there. –  Hooked Feb 24 '12 at 4:05
    
Could be 7,1,2 where x(7)+y(1)=8, y(1)+z(2)=3, then x(7)+z(2)=9 But that's just one solution, you could get into irrational numbers and complex numbers, negatives, exponents, powers, etc. If you want to solve it algebraically, you can look into substitution, which is explained here: cstl.syr.edu/fipse/algebra/unit5/subst.htm I think there are infinite solutions, so whatever you come up with solving this could be extraneous. –  ionFish Feb 24 '12 at 4:08
    
You need the same number of equations as unknown variables. –  Avram Feb 24 '12 at 4:09
    
@Avram you only need the same number of equations as variables if you want a unique solution to a linear equation. There are many solutions to the equations above - I'm sure we will see plenty of examples below! –  Hooked Feb 24 '12 at 4:15

2 Answers 2

There are an infinite number of solutions. To show this, we can combine the first two equations to get:

y = 8 - x
(8 - x) + z = 3
=> 5 + z = x

Combining that with the final equation gives:

(5 + z) + z = ?
= > 2 z + 5 = ?

So for every possible value of z we get a different solution.

z = 0 => x = 5, y = 3, x + z = 5
z = 1 => x = 6, y = 2, x + z = 7
z = 2 => x = 7, y = 1, x + z = 9
x = 3 => x = 8, y = 0, x + z = 11
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x+z = 11-2y

from:

x+y = 8 (i)
y+z = 3 (ii) => z = 3-y (iii)

(i)-(ii) => x-z = 5 (iv)
(iv)+2z => x+z = 5+2z (v)
(iii) in (v) => x+z = 5+2(3-y) = 11-2y

you have two knowns and three unknowns, so the best you can do is a linear relationship. the answer is not "impossible"; it's just not a simple number.

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