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I have a embeded record in delphi like this:

TKernel = packed record
    State: Integer;
end;
TKernels = array[0..19] of TKernel;

TShell = packed record
  Kernels: TKernels;
end;

In this,

SizeOf(TShell) = 20 * SizeOf(TKernel).

But If I use C#:

struct Shell
{
    Kernel[] Kernels;
    public Shell(int i = 20)
    {
        Kernels = new Kernel[20];
    }
}

then: Marshal.SizeOf(Shell) == 4

that means Kernels is just a pointer. I want to InterOp C# with Delphi, so I need there memory structure is the same, So how should I declare the struct in C# besides write 20 likes of Kernel KernelOne; Kernel KernelTwo。。。

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would always avoid unsafe if at all possible since unsafe code is, well, not safe. And it is quite possible to avoid in this case:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1)]
struct Kernel
{
    int State;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack=1)]
struct Shell
{
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst=20)]
    Kernel[] Kernels;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks David; like Richard Schneider, I learned something new today. I'm curious though: the declarations above cause the type to have a size of 80 (reported by Marshal.SizeOf), but Kernels has a default value of null, and it's possible to assign a Kernel[] of any length. So the managed type is obviously a normal managed type. Do you know how that's marshalled (especially if the managed array is of the wrong length)? Do you know where this is documented? There's not much detail at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z6cfh6e6(v=vs.100).aspx. Thanks again! – phoog Feb 24 '12 at 18:02
    
Extra items will be truncated. Missing items will be marshalled using default values. – David Heffernan Feb 24 '12 at 19:18

You can do this in unsafe code with the fixed keyword:

unsafe struct Shell
{
    public fixed Kernel Kernels[20];
}

EDIT

This use of fixed was added in C# 2.0, according to the documentation for "fixed size buffers."

EDIT 2

And, oops, you can only created fixed-size buffers of a primitive type; as the documentation states, "the only restriction is that the array type must be bool, byte, char, short, int, long, sbyte, ushort, uint, ulong, float, or double"

share|improve this answer
    
And here I thought I knew everything about C#. Well done! – Richard Schneider Feb 24 '12 at 5:17
    
@RichardSchneider thanks :-) I added a link to the documentation, in case you are interested. – phoog Feb 24 '12 at 5:27
    
@phoog Thanks. But esides unsafe code, any thing "safe" in case the assembly can not be build using /unsafe? – chenwq Feb 24 '12 at 7:14
    
@RichardSchneider investigating David Heffernan's solution, I found that fixed-sized buffers are limited to certain primitive types. :( See the edited post for details. – phoog Feb 24 '12 at 18:05

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