Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The query I'm running is as follows, however I'm getting this error:

#1054 - Unknown column 'guaranteed_postcode' in 'IN/ALL/ANY subquery'

SELECT `users`.`first_name`, `users`.`last_name`, `users`.`email`,
SUBSTRING(`locations`.`raw`,-6,4) AS `guaranteed_postcode`
FROM `users` LEFT OUTER JOIN `locations`
ON `users`.`id` = `locations`.`user_id`
WHERE `guaranteed_postcode` NOT IN #this is where the fake col is being used
(
 SELECT `postcode` FROM `postcodes` WHERE `region` IN
 (
  'australia'
 )
)

My question is: why am I unable to use a fake column in the where clause of the same DB query?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 171 down vote accepted

You can only use column aliases in GROUP BY, ORDER BY, or HAVING clauses.

Standard SQL doesn't allow you to refer to a column alias in a WHERE clause. This restriction is imposed because when the WHERE code is executed, the column value may not yet be determined.

Copied from MySql documentation

share|improve this answer
6  
+1 for ref (and accuracy) –  Jonathan Fingland Jun 3 '09 at 0:40
1  
Cheers for the quick and accurate response! I've had a look into the HAVING clause and worked out a way to successfully run this query. Thanks again. –  James Jun 3 '09 at 0:42
    
+1 for the reference and for the nice answer –  chermosillo Jul 23 '09 at 4:03
15  
In case anyone else has same prob as me which was using the aliased col in a where clause failing - swapping the 'WHERE' for 'HAVING fixed it straight away +1 good answer. –  megaSteve4 May 28 '12 at 0:14
2  
This may or may not be important in your case, but HAVING executes slower than WHERE –  DTs Apr 25 at 8:38

As Victor pointed out, the problem is with the alias. This can be avoided though, by putting the expression directly into the WHERE x IN y clause:

SELECT `users`.`first_name`,`users`.`last_name`,`users`.`email`,SUBSTRING(`locations`.`raw`,-6,4) AS `guaranteed_postcode`
FROM `users` LEFT OUTER JOIN `locations`
ON `users`.`id` = `locations`.`user_id`
WHERE SUBSTRING(`locations`.`raw`,-6,4) NOT IN #this is where the fake col is being used
(
 SELECT `postcode` FROM `postcodes` WHERE `region` IN
 (
  'australia'
 )
)

However, I guess this is very inefficient, since the subquery has to be executed for every row of the outer query.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for providing a workaround this issue! –  Aris Apr 24 '13 at 6:44

Standard SQL (or MySQL) does not permit the use of column aliases in a WHERE clause because

when the WHERE clause is evaluated, the column value may not yet have been determined.

(from MySQL documentation). What you can do is calculate the column value in the WHERE clause, save the value in a variable, and use it in the field list. For example you could do this:

SELECT `users`.`first_name`, `users`.`last_name`, `users`.`email`,
@postcode AS `guaranteed_postcode`
FROM `users` LEFT OUTER JOIN `locations`
ON `users`.`id` = `locations`.`user_id`
WHERE (@postcode := SUBSTRING(`locations`.`raw`,-6,4)) NOT IN
(
 SELECT `postcode` FROM `postcodes` WHERE `region` IN
 (
  'australia'
 )
)

This avoids evaluating the expression twice.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this conflict with the documentation that says "As a general rule, you should never assign a value to a user variable and read the value within the same statement. You might get the results you expect, but this is not guaranteed."? –  Arjan Nov 19 at 8:58
    
That's definitely something to keep in mind. It has always worked for me though, I think the order of evaluation of the different parts of a statement had to be fixed (first WHERE, then SELECT, then GROUP BY,...) but I don't have a reference for that –  Joni Nov 21 at 6:44
    
A few examples: some claim that for them select @code:=sum(2), 2*@code works in MySQL 5.5, but for me in 5.6 the second column yields NULL on first invocation, and returns 2 times the previous result when run again. Interesting enough, both select @code:=2, 2*@code and select @code:=rand(), 2*@code do seem to work in my 5.6 (today). But those are indeed writing and reading in the SELECT clause; in your case you're setting it in WHERE. –  Arjan Nov 21 at 7:59

I am using mysql 5.5.24 and the following code works:

select * from (
SELECT `users`.`first_name`, `users`.`last_name`, `users`.`email`,
SUBSTRING(`locations`.`raw`,-6,4) AS `guaranteed_postcode`
FROM `users` LEFT OUTER JOIN `locations`
ON `users`.`id` = `locations`.`user_id`
) as a
WHERE guaranteed_postcode NOT IN #this is where the fake col is being used
(
 SELECT `postcode` FROM `postcodes` WHERE `region` IN
 (
  'australia'
 )
)
share|improve this answer

Maybe my answer is too late but this can help others.

You can enclose it with another select statement and use where clause to it.

SELECT * FROM (Select col1, col2,...) as t WHERE t.calcAlias > 0

calcAlias is the alias column that was calculated.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.