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I am running tcsh/csh shell on my machine. lately i have realized my stderr file redirection is not working.

Please find the terminal logs as below:

>echo b c >>& log
>cat log
b c
>echo $a b c >>& log
a: Undefined variable.
>cat log
b c

I have never faced such issues, hence not sure how to debug or troubleshoot. Please advice!

An alterate method of redirection is using tee. While I use >& or >>& , i am altogether blocking any output to be displayed on terminal. Is there a way I can do both, that is: for each statement

a) direct stdout+stderr to a file.

b) display stdout+stderr on terminal

I need to confirm if i can use something like this(below) to meet my requirements

>csh ./script_name | tee -a log

In my case it only directs stdout to log file and blocks stderr.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm pretty certain that the evaluation of $a is being done by the current shell, before the redirection is set up for the echo subshell?

It seems to be supported by the fact that the echo isn't actually writing to the file at all, which you could see if you deleted the log file before the second attempt:

[pax ~]$ echo b c >>& log

[pax ~]$ cat log
b c

[pax ~]$ rm log

[pax ~]$ echo $a b c >> & log
a: Undefined variable.

[pax ~]$ cat log
cat: log: No such file or directory

And also by the fact that, if you run the echo in an explicit subshell with the redirection done for the subshell rather than the echo, you get your desired result:

[pax ~]$ ( echo $a b c ) >> & log

[pax ~]$ cat log
b c
a: Undefined variable.

In fact, you can see this without even using a valid command:

[pax ~]$ rm log

[pax ~]$ $xyzzy
xyzzy: Undefined variable.

[pax ~]$ $xyzzy >>&log
xyzzy: Undefined variable.

[pax ~]$ cat log
cat: log: No such file or directory

The reason for this is that the current shell is complaining about trying to evaluate $xyzzy. This makes sense. With the command:

someCmd $HOME

the someCmd executable will never see the literal $HOME, it's actually replaced with the value. And that replacement is done by the shell before someCmd is even set up (including having its standard input or output streams modified).

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I am not sure how to check that. From what I understand, even if interpretation is done for $a, it should not halt execution, but should direct stdout+stderr to log file. –  Ani Feb 24 '12 at 6:47
    
@Ani, you can check it, as I have, by forcing the redirection to happen first then doing the expansion, a la ( echo $a ) >>&log. I've updated the answer with more detail. –  paxdiablo Feb 24 '12 at 7:05
    
Thanks for the reply, that makes it more clear to me how statements are being executed. –  Ani Feb 24 '12 at 7:31
    
have updated my query, please have a look. –  Ani Feb 24 '12 at 7:38

You cannot perform file descriptor manipulation and the mantra that Csh Programming is considered harmful has been echoed for the past 20 years.

There are a lot of alternative shells available and even /bin/sh is a better option to program scripts than tcsh/csh. I would hope after all this time nobody is forcing you to use csh.

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You can down vote but csh cannot 2>&1 –  tawman Feb 24 '12 at 6:59
    
You're right about that, but I'm not sure exactly what that has to do with the question at hand. I find compilers from certain large nameless companies to be inadequate as per ISO standards but, when I'm asked a question about them, I don't rant about how the asker should switch to gcc :-) You don't debug a minor problem like this by changing and relearning all your tools. –  paxdiablo Feb 24 '12 at 7:03
    
@paxdiablo The person ask why can't I redirect stderr to the file and my answer is you can't. CSH does not support it. That is a far cry from the false argument you suggest. Totally unrelated. –  tawman Feb 24 '12 at 7:05
    
I think you misunderstood the question. OP said nothing about redirecting only stdout, otherwise they wouldn't be using >>&. If that was the case, then your answer would be useful. The problem is that the redirection isn't kicking in soon enough to capture the "undefined variable" message, and this is due to the expansion being done by the shell. The solution, which is to sub-shell it explicitly, applying the redirection to the shell rather than echo which never runs because of the error. –  paxdiablo Feb 24 '12 at 7:10
    
@paxdiablo I misunderstood nothing. "lately i have realized my stderr file redirection is not working" ... it never worked in csh. Shows a complete lack of knowledge that csh can support what they thought it could. –  tawman Feb 24 '12 at 7:12

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