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I know the distance to various points on a plane, as it is being viewed from an angle. I want to find the equation for this plane from just that information (5 to 15 different points, as many as necessary).

I will later use the equation for the plane to estimate what the distance to the plane should be at different points; in order to prove that it is roughly flat.

Unfortunately, a google search doesn't bring much up. :(

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I believe that this might be the answer to my question: jtaylor1142001.net/calcjat/Solutions/VPlanes/VP3Pts.htm –  Emile Victor Feb 24 '12 at 6:56
    
I assume you are talking about planes in 3D. There are numerous ways to define plane equation. In general, you need only 3 points to define a plane. –  Petr Budnik Feb 24 '12 at 7:00
    
@Azza: 3 known points on the plane (distance 0). If you have 5 points at distances d0..d4 to the plane, you have to construct 5 spheres and find a plane which touches all 5 spheres. Far harder. –  MSalters Feb 24 '12 at 9:25
    
@MSalters I thought: "I know the distance to various points on a plane, as it is being viewed from an angle. I want to find the equation for this plane from just that information (5 to 15 different points, as many as necessary)."_ means that all points are in-plane and the plane equation is needed. –  Petr Budnik Feb 24 '12 at 9:30
    
@EmileVictor: No, that assumes you have {x,y,z} for 3 points in the plane. You only have x²+y²+z² (distance). –  MSalters Feb 24 '12 at 9:32

3 Answers 3

I'm going to skip over the process of finding the best fit plane, it's been handled in some other answers, and talk about something else.

"Prove" takes us into statistical inference. The way this is done is you make a formal hypothesis "the surface is flat" and then see if the data supports rejecting this hypothesis at some confidence level.

So you can wind up saying "I'm not even 1% sure that the surface isn't flat" -- but you can't ever prove that it's flat.

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If you, indeed, know distances and not coordinates, then it is ill-posed problem - there is infinite number of planes that will have points with any number of given distances from origin.

This is easy to verify. Let's take shortest distance D0, from set of given distances {D0..DN-1} , and construct a plane with normal vector {D0,0,0} (vector of length D0 along x-axis). For each of remaining lengths we now have infinite number of points that will lie in this plane (forming circles in-plane around (D0,0,0) point). Moreover, we can rotate all vectors by an arbitrary angle and get a new plane.

Here is simple picture in 2D (distances to a line; it's simpler to draw ;) ).

image

As we can see, there are TWO points on the line for each distance D1..DN-1 > D0 - one is shown for D1 and D2, and the two other for these distances would be placed in 4th quadrant (+x, -y). Moreover, we can rotate our line around origin by an arbitrary angle and still satisfy given distances.

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Geometry? Sounds like a job for math.SE! What form will the equation take? Will it be a plane?

I will assume you want an accurate solution.

  1. Find the absolute positions with geometry
  2. Make a best fit regression line in C++ in 2 of the 3 dimensions.
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Sounds like way overly complicated way to solve, when OP actually has 3+ points already in-plane. –  Petr Budnik Feb 24 '12 at 7:02
    
My understanding is that the OP doesn't have a plane, but a skater of points from which he wants to make a plane? –  Mikhail Feb 25 '12 at 18:52

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