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local uLong unzlocal_SearchCentralDir OF((
    const zlib_filefunc_def* pzlib_filefunc_def,
    voidpf filestream));

local uLong unzlocal_SearchCentralDir(pzlib_filefunc_def,filestream)
    const zlib_filefunc_def* pzlib_filefunc_def;
    voidpf filestream;
{

...the rest source.

The above C source is from unzip.c.

I'm wondering what is the syntax of the function prototype line? Especially where is the keywork "OF" from or what is it for?

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OF is probably a macro that removes the prototype on very old compilers. –  Vaughn Cato Feb 24 '12 at 7:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The two things of interest in that code are the words local and OF.

The word local is #defined to static by default in gzguts.h. The comment explains why:

#ifndef local
#  define local static
#endif
/* compile with -Dlocal if your debugger can't find static symbols */

So we deduce that someone, at some point in the past, had to use a debugger that didn't handle static functions well. You can compile zlib with all functions global to work around that problem.

The word OF is #defined in zconf.h:

#ifndef OF /* function prototypes */
#  ifdef STDC
#    define OF(args)  args
#  else
#    define OF(args)  ()
#  endif
#endif

This definition allows zlib to be compiled with pre-ANSI-standard compilers that do not support function prototypes. In pre-ANSI C, a function declaration had to look like this:

uLong unzlocal_SearchCentralDir();

regardless of what parameters the function takes. This macro allows functions to be declared with their prototype argument lists, but the argument lists are elided if the compiler doesn't support ANSI C.

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thx for the answer! –  pandakweb Feb 24 '12 at 7:33

Seach through the headers for the line:

#define OF(x) ...

Here, x and ... might be something else. OF is not a keyword, it is a macro. From "zconf.h":

#ifndef OF /* function prototypes */
#  ifdef STDC
#    define OF(args)  args
#  else
#    define OF(args)  ()
#  endif
#endif

This is used to allow the same code to compile on both ANSI C compilers (1989 or more recent) and pre-ANSI C compilers (before 1989). We don't care about compilers that old any more, but zlib has been around for a long time (since 1995) and they haven't dropped support for old compilers yet. You'll find similar definitions in LibPNG.

In 1995, DOS was still quite common on the desktop. There's no use programming that way now.

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thx for the answer! –  pandakweb Feb 24 '12 at 7:24

It has been macro-ified to successfully work on multiple compilers.

local is undoubtedly #define local static on most platforms.

OF leaves the parameters unmodified on most modern compilers, but with old K&R-only style parameters, it would refactor unzlocal_SearchCentralDir OF(const zlib_filefunc_def* pzlib_filefunc_def, voidpf filestream) into

   unzlocal_SearchCentralDir (pzlib_filefunc_def, filestream)
      const zlib_filefunc_def* pzlib_filefunc_def;
      voidpf filestream;
   {  // begin function body...
share|improve this answer
    
thx for the answer! –  pandakweb Feb 24 '12 at 7:34

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