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I am joining 2 in memory collections

var items = 
    from el in elements 
    join def in Cached.Elements() 
        on el.Value equals def.Name into temp1
    from res in temp1.DefaultIfEmpty()                        
    select new
    {
        el.NodeType, 
        res.DefKey, 
        res.DefType, 
        res.BaseKey, 
        el.Value 
    };

However, ideally if one of the elements can't be found, I'd like to raise an exception, something akin to

throw new System.Exception(el.Value + " cannot be found in cache!");

I was looking at the System.Interactive which offers a Catch extension method but I am unsure how to reference the current 'el' in that context. So for example I was wondering about something like

    var items = (
        from el in elements 
        join def in Cached.Elements() 
            on el.Value equals def.Name into temp1
        from res in temp1.DefaultIfEmpty()                        
        select new 
        { 
            el.NodeType, 
            res.DefKey, 
            res.DefType, 
            res.BaseKey, 
            el.Value 
        })
        .ThrowIfEmpty();

but, istm, that that would entail passing the whole set into the extension method rather than raising the exception when the missing value is encountered.

Alternatively, I could replace the DefaultIfEmpty with a ThrowIfEmpty

    var items = (
        from el in elements 
        join def in Cached.Elements() 
            on el.Value equals def.Name into temp1
        from res in temp1.ThrowIfEmpty()                        
        select new 
        { 
            el.NodeType, 
            res.DefKey, 
            res.DefType, 
            res.BaseKey, 
            el.Value 
        });

Is there a 'proper'/better way to do this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use GroupJoin. Something like this should work for you:

elements.GroupJoin(Cached.Elements(), e => e.Value, d => d.Name, (e, dSeq) => {
    var d = dSeq.Single();
    return new { e, d };
});

The GroupJoin resultSelector accepts two arguments: the left key, and the sequence of matching right keys. You can raise an exception if the sequence is empty; one way to achieve that would be to use the Single operator.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx very much Igor. Good pointer. A further q ... Am I right in thinking that you would be wrapping the linq statement in a try catch rather than throwing the exception in the context of the fluent interface (FWIW I've no qualms about, that just wanted to check)? –  Simon Woods Feb 24 '12 at 7:55
    
Sorry ... ok... the penny just dropped! Throw the exception from within the lambda. –  Simon Woods Feb 24 '12 at 8:01

I think this is one of the places where you can use Composite Keys.

if you use equals keyword to execute equality on join.

from documentation :

You create a composite key as an anonymous type or named typed with the values that you want to compare. If the query variable will be passed across method boundaries, use a named type that overrides Equals and GetHashCode for the key

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Thx –  Simon Woods Feb 24 '12 at 8:22

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