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I have a table Customers that is linked to another table Addresses. The Addresses table has a Primary Key made up of {CustomerID, LanguageID}.

I would like to wrtie a LINQ query where I instantiate a type and populate its

Dictionary<string, Address> Addresses {get;set;}

property with the addresses in the Address table. Each Langauge is to become the key in the dictionary.

Like so:

from c in customers
from a in c.Addresses
select new DataContainer
{
  ID = c.CustomerId,
  ...
  Addresses.Add(a.LanguageId, a),
  ...
};

I know that I really can't do the .Add() call in an object initializer, but is there a way to make that work?

Note: I could of course create the type as usual and then go back in and populate the Addresses property explicitely.

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Won't you have many more Addresses than languages? Or is it a Dictionary per Customer? –  Henk Holterman Feb 24 '12 at 8:35
    
@Henk: each customer has 7 addresses. So one dictinoary per customer. –  John Feb 24 '12 at 8:41

3 Answers 3

I don't remember from memory if following code will compile, but you can try something like this:

from c in customers
from a in c.Addresses
select new DataContainer
{    
  Addresses = new Dictionary<string, Address> {{a.LanguageId, a}};
};

Or you can try following solution: Instantiating a Dictionary from a LINQ projection

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+1 - this should do the trick (especially if referring to your link) –  jim tollan Feb 24 '12 at 8:38
    
I don't see how this would work since each customer has a DataContainer, and each container needs to have 7 addresses (which come from the addresses table). Creating a new dictionary like above would always only add one entry to the dictionary. Right? –  John Feb 24 '12 at 9:24
    
It seems like object initializer are only supported for single items, i.e. not dictionaries. I get an exception. –  John Feb 24 '12 at 10:02
    
You can use dictionary intializers, but probably they are not supported in EF. You can do that with LINQ but directly on EF. You can try return list and then select DataContainer. –  Marcin Feb 24 '12 at 11:17

A safe way to do this is like so:

If DataContainer looks like this:

public class DataContainer
{
    public string ID { get; set; }
    public Address Address { get; set; }
}

You can do this:

from c in customers
from a in c.Addresses
select new DataContainer
{
  ID = c.CustomerId,
  Address = a
};
var dic = new Dictionary<string, Address>();

foreach (var n in query)
{
  dic.Add(ID,a);
}

Or for short do this:

var dic = query.ToDictionary<DataContainer, string, Address>(n => n.ID, n => n.a);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this but there's a mistake on the last line of code, it should be: var dic = query.ToDictionary<DataContainer, string, Address>(n => n.ID, n => n.a); –  GrandMasterFlush Dec 14 '12 at 15:26
    
I edited it, thanks. –  The Muffin Man Dec 14 '12 at 20:19

In response to John's comment for henk.

I wrote a Dictionary extension

public static Dictionary<T, K> Build<T, K>(this Dictionary<T, K> dictionary, T key, K value)
{
       dictionary[key] = value;
       return dictionary;
}

Now you can do something like this:

from c in customers
from a in c.Addresses
select new DataContainer
{    
  Addresses = new Dictionary<string, Address>()
                                              .Build(a.LanguageId, a)
};

For me it does work. :)

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