Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my Java program , where i am setting the Objects with in the for loop as shown

ArrayList list = new ArrayList();
for(int j = 0;j<=4;j++)
{
Student student = new Student();
studunt.name="Ravi";
list.add(student);
}

Then i need to parse this List and set it inside a StudentResponse ( Which is consisting of a Student[])

StudentResponse  response = new StudentResponse();

    for (int in = 0; in < list.size(); in++) {
    {
    Student data = (TopListsQuoteData) list.get(in);
    response. student[in] = data;
    }

This is my StudentResponse class

public class StudentResponse 
{
public  Student[] student;
}

I am getting a NullPointerException at this line response. student[in] = data;

Please help , Thanks .

share|improve this question
    
How is your public Student[] student; variable initialized ? –  Olivier.Roger Feb 24 '12 at 9:51
1  
It is also helpful if the code you post is at least compilable. You declare a variable named student then work with another variable named studunt. What other differences might there be between what you have and what we see? –  Michael Kjörling Feb 24 '12 at 9:54
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to initialize the array before you can use it. Something like this:

StudentResponse  response = new StudentResponse();
response.student = new Student[list.size()];
for (int in = 0; in < list.size(); in++) {
{
    Student data = (TopListsQuoteData) list.get(in);
    response. student[in] = data;
}

Also i would suggest to use the iterator of the list instead of accessing the items by index. This works, but I feel it's not so clean and definitely not as efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
You would still need to maintain an index to address the resultant student[] array, so using foreach in this context is probably not that much cleaner - also, you claim it's less efficient to index the list by in - generally, List.get() is O(1). –  mcfinnigan Feb 24 '12 at 9:54
add comment

Initialize!

like

public  Student[] student = new Student[100];

may be.

or

public StudentResponse(int capacity){
   this.student = new Student[capacity];
}
share|improve this answer
    
That would still contain nulls. Olivier Roger's comment is the key point. –  Highland Mark Feb 24 '12 at 9:56
    
well, as far as you see the code, this operation response. student[in] = data; is throwing exception. Unless you're explicitly setting response.student null elsewhere, this code would work. Obviously, the array will contain null, so, if you pull an element that was not set to anything will see a null. But insertion will go fine as long you're not crossing the bound of the array. I guess this is the whole point here. –  Nishant Feb 24 '12 at 10:01
add comment

Do you initialise your array in the constructor of StudentResponse? Something like

public StudentResponse(int numberOfStudents) {
   this.student = new Student[numberOfStudents];
}

You may want to switch out the student array as another kind of list - lists are generally much nicer to work with.

public class StudentResponse {
    private List<Student> students;

   public StudentResponse() {
      this.students = new ArrayList<Student>();
   }

   public void addStudent(Student student) {
       this.students.add(student);
   }

   public List<Student> getStudents() {
       return this.students;
   }

}

Now you can modify your code like so:

StudentResponse  response = new StudentResponse();

for (int in = 0; in < list.size(); in++) {
{
Student data = (TopListsQuoteData) list.get(in);
response.addStudent(data);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

And you have a spelling Error in your code

Student student = new Student();
studunt.name="Ravi";

but I think you want:

Student student = new Student();
student.name="Ravi";
share|improve this answer
add comment

If all you need is a copy of the list, but as an array:

response.student = list.toArray(new Student[list.size()]);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.