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Here's a simplified version of my code that compiles:

#include <iostream>

class pos
{
    public:
        char (&board)[64];
        pos(char (&arr)[64])
            : board(arr)
        {
            *board = *arr;
        }
        void print();
};

void pos::print()
{
    for (int y=0; y<8; y++)
    {
        for (int x=0; x<8; x++)
            std::cout << (int) board[x + y*8] << " ";
        std::cout << "\n";
    }
}

int main()
{
    char test[64] = {
        0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,
        1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,
        2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
        3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10,
        4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10,11,
        5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10,11,12,
        6, 7, 8, 9,10,11,12,13,
        7, 8, 9,10,11,12,13,14 };

    pos p(test);
    p.print();

    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

But if I change all instances of pos to position, I get the error: main.obj : error LNK2005: "public: void __thiscall position::print(void)" (?print@position@@QAEXXZ) already defined in position.obj 1>D:\Programming\Test\Debug\Test.exe : fatal error LNK1169: one or more multiply defined symbols found

Oddly, the class used to be named position and compiled fine until I made some changes to how it handles the board array. Can someone explain why I'm getting this error?

Update

Now it doesn't matter what the class is named, I get the same error. I created a new MSVC++ project, copied the source files, and did a new build. Same error. Here's the actual code, instead of the concise version.

main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "position.cpp"

int main()
{
    char test[64] = {               // Simple mate test position; TODO: move to test suite
        OO,BK,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,
        OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,WR,
        OO,WK,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,
        OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,
        OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,
        OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,
        OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,
        OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO,OO };

    position pos(test);
    pos.print();

    std::cin.get();

    return 0;
}

position.cpp

#include <iostream>

// Board-centric representation; pass as 64-byte array

#define WK 0x0  // White King   
#define WQ 0x1  // White Queen
#define WR 0x2  // White Rook
#define WB 0x3  // White Bishop
#define WN 0x4  // White Knight
#define WP 0x5  // White Pawn
#define BK 0x6  // Black King
#define BQ 0x7  // Black Queen
#define BR 0x8  // Black Rook
#define BB 0x9  // Black Bishop
#define BN 0xA  // Black Knight
#define BP 0xB  // Black Pawn
// 0xC: unused
// 0xD: unused
// 0xE: unused
#define OO 0xF  // Empty

class position
{
    public:
        char (&board)[64];
        position(char (&arr)[64])   // TODO: 'board' dies if the variable passed through 'arr' dies. Allocating memory might fix this. See 'new' and 'shared_ptr'.
            : board(arr)
        {
            *board = *arr;
        }
        void print();
};

void position::print()
{
    for (int y=0; y<8; y++)
    {
        for (int x=0; x<8; x++)
            std::cout << (int) board[x + y*8] << " ";
        std::cout << "\n";
    }
}

(I'm writing a program to figure out simple chess endgames.)

As you can see, position::print() is only defined in one place, contrary to the error message...unless I'm seriously overlooking something. It's pretty early.

share|improve this question
1  
Are you linking against an old obj file where the class used to be named position? Where did position.obj come from? –  Retired Ninja Feb 24 '12 at 10:20
    
No, position is not a keyword. Are you sure you're doing a completely clean build? –  larsmans Feb 24 '12 at 10:22
    
There are no errors with compiling your code with g++ after replacing all pos to position. –  citxx Feb 24 '12 at 10:25
    
@Retired Ninja: The pos class above used to be called position. –  Svad Histhana Feb 24 '12 at 10:32
    
@larsmans: Yes. See my update. –  Svad Histhana Feb 24 '12 at 11:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you're compiling the code contained in position.cpp twice, and you're trying to linking the compiled code into one file.

The problem is caused by this line in main.cpp:

#include "position.cpp"

You're including the C++ source file, not the header. This means that all code in position.cpp is included in main.cpp and then the resulting file is compiled. You then compile position.cpp on it's own.

Try to include position.h instead - if there's no such header yet, define it. The alternative fix is to not add position.cpp to the list of sources to be compiled.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I'm a novice, so I've yet to learn about header files. Now seems to be the right time. ;) –  Svad Histhana Feb 24 '12 at 11:34

You shouldn't #include "position.cpp" in your main file, but a header file for the position class instead.

share|improve this answer
    
dang, should have posted a shorter answer :D –  r_ahlskog Feb 24 '12 at 11:19
    
I'm too lazy to do it, but I think the OP deserves a better explanation of how translation units work. It's your chance :) –  Mr. kbok Feb 24 '12 at 11:21
    
after a big lunch like I just had I don't think that will happen right now :) –  r_ahlskog Feb 24 '12 at 11:23

You are including postition.cpp in main.cpp, probably your build system also builds position.cpp separately and then the linker finds multiple definitions of your class.

You should make a separate header and add include guards, #pragma once for example on msvc

share|improve this answer
    
Strange that it worked fine until recently... The consensus is definitely to include a header file instead of the cpp file. Thank you for your explanation and advice. –  Svad Histhana Feb 24 '12 at 11:32

The error message states that you have two definitions of void position::print(), one in main.cpp the other one in position.cpp.

share|improve this answer
    
But I don't. Is there another explanation? –  Svad Histhana Feb 24 '12 at 10:38
    
My best guess is that you don't master your build system and you are linking in position.cpp even if you think you aren't. –  AProgrammer Feb 24 '12 at 10:42
    
Oh, I'm linking in position.cpp in my original code. But the class and its methods are only defined in one place. The code I gave above was rewritten for brevity. –  Svad Histhana Feb 24 '12 at 10:45
    
I added an update with the original code. –  Svad Histhana Feb 24 '12 at 11:17

It's not a reserved word, it's a name that you used in position.cpp. You're using the same name, but with a different meaning in main.cpp.

share|improve this answer

The compiler/linker deals in translation units, not files. You may have the definition of position::print in one file (position.cpp). But the definition is actually present in two translation units since you wrote #include "position.cpp". You violated the ODR (one definition rule).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for explaining this. –  Svad Histhana Feb 24 '12 at 11:33

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