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    Integer i1= new Integer(9);
    Integer i2= new Integer(9);

    if(i1==i2){
        System.out.println("true");
    }else{
        System.out.println("false");
    }


    int i3=9;
    int i4=9;

    if(i3==i4){
        System.out.println("true");
    }else{
        System.out.println("false");
    }

    if(i3==i2){
        System.out.println("true");
    }else{
        System.out.println("false");
    }

In Above Code First if-else print false, Why ?.But when second Return true and also third have true.I think wrapper classes(Like double,boolean,char)cant compare True ?

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possible duplicate of When comparing two Integers in Java does auto-unboxing occur? –  McDowell Feb 24 '12 at 13:10

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First if-else print false. Why?

== checks if the two references are referring to the same object, in this case they are not so the == check is false. You need to use Integer.equals(), not ==:

if (i1.equals(i2){
    System.out.println("true");
}else{
    System.out.println("false");
}

Second return true

== is correct to use for primitives: int is a primitive.

third have true

As pointed out by JB Nizet i2 is unboxed to an int which makes the if condition a check between two int primitives.

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but what happens with == ?....in boolean we check like isClicked==true it gives Right? –  Samir Mangroliya Feb 24 '12 at 10:35
    
boolean is primitive, not object, Boolean is an object. –  Amir Pashazadeh Feb 24 '12 at 10:37
    
Primitives such as boolean, int, etc use ==, so yes if you have a boolean named isClicked you are correct to use isClicked == true. –  hmjd Feb 24 '12 at 10:37
    
i1 and i2 is two different objects. If you compare them with == it will return false because it is comparing two different object. Where as if you use equals you are comparing the values of the two objects –  Marl Feb 24 '12 at 10:37
    
If isClicked is a boolean, there is no point in comparing it with another boolean. Just use if (isClicked). –  JB Nizet Feb 24 '12 at 10:38

When == is used to compare references to objects, it returns true only if both references point to the same object.

In the first case, you have two different objects.

In the second case, you're not comparing objects, but primitive types.

In the third case, the Integer object is unboxed to its primitive int value to be compared with the primitive value, so two primitive values are compared.

You should never use == to compare objects, except for enums. Always use .equals().

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Whenever you use "==", you are doing a object reference check. That means, the first check will fail since they are 2 different objects.

In the second case, its straight forward.

In the third case, the compiler autoboxes "i2". So, the comparison will work fine.

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Remember you are not comparing 2 primitives but 2 Objects.. so Use .equals() method..

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The variables i1 and i2 refer to Objects, not primitive types. Using the == operator on objects in Java checks that the references are equal, if you want to compare them you should use the .equals() method.

The comparison of i3 and i2 returns true because you're comparing a primitive type (the int i3) with a wrapper class for that primitive type (the Integer i2), so Java unboxes the value of i2 to an int and then compares them (which does work with the == operator).

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in first if - you are compare two objects - thay are different. Result = false in second - you are compare two int values. Result true in therd - you are compare int and Integer, after unboxing you have two int. Result - true. for Integer use equals.

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The first case, JVM checks whether both i1 and i2 are same reference or not. As they are different so it results false.

The second case, it's no problem as both are primitive data types and have same value, so it's true.

In third case, i2 is first autounboxed and then comparision takes place, so it results true.

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With the autocast, (int)i1==(int)i2 will return true, so will (i1==i4) As the other comments explained it, == only compares the objects (which references are passed by value)

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another "safe" and alternative way is using the modulo operation

 if ( ( i3%i4)==0) System.out.println("true");
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its wrong becase i have i3=10 and i4 =20 ,its print true... –  Samir Mangroliya Feb 24 '12 at 10:43
    
oh, yeah, you are right, i see my error. Sorry! –  blackmamba Feb 24 '12 at 10:44

The operator == is checking to see, whether two REFERENCES are equal. In your example, you instantiate two different objects of type integer and then you ask if they are the same.

if you want to compare the values of Integer-Objects, use the .compare() Function, or the .equals, if you only want to check for equality.

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